Two Lakes Lodge

Guest Information Guide

 

May 2011

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By

Larry and Kate Gomes

Rocklawn Realty, LLC

10 Old Flanders Road

Westborough, MA  01581

508-366-1172

 

 

 

 


Table of Contents

 

 

1      Contact Information. 6

1.1       Welcome. 6

1.2       Phone Numbers and Lodge Address. 6

1.3       Other Medical Related Information. 6

 

2      Getting to Two Lakes Lodge. 7

 

3      Local Road Information. 8

3.1       South Pond Road. 8

3.2       Kelly Road. 8

3.3       Driving With The Locals. 8

3.4       Moose – Real or Imagined Threat?. 8

 

4      Access Instructions. 9

4.1       Entering the Lodge. 9

4.2       Leaving the Lodge at the End of Your Visit 9

 

5      Lighting and Fan Controls. 10

5.1       Automatic Lighting Mode. 10

5.2       Using The Light Switches. 10

5.3       Scene Lighting Mode. 10

5.4       Outdoor Lights. 10

5.5       Spot Lights. 11

5.6       Soffit Lights. 11

5.7       Wall Sconces. 11

5.8       Using the Fan Switches. 11

5.9       Bathroom Fans. 11

 

6      Heat and Air Conditioning Controls. 12

6.1       Upper Level Control 12

6.2       Lower Level Control 13

 

7      Pellet Stove, Fireplace and Generator 14

7.1       Pellet Stove. 14

7.2       Fireplace. 14

7.3       Generator 14

 

8      Sound System.. 15

8.1       Sound System Keypads. 15

8.2       FM Receiver 15

8.3       Audiotron MP3 Music Player 16

8.4       Weather Forecast and Current Weather 17

9      Grocery, Department and Hardware Stores (in near to far order) 18

9.1       Gord’s Corner Store – West Milan, NH (apx. 4 miles) 18

9.2       Groveton Market – Groveton, NH (apx. 9 miles) 18

9.3       Perras ACE Hardware and Lumber  – Lancaster, NH (apx. 9 miles) 18

9.4       Shaw’s Supermarket – Lancaster, NH (apx. 18 miles) 18

9.5       Berlin IGA Foodliner - Berlin, NH (apx. 15 miles) 18

9.6       Save-A-Lot - Gorham, NH (apx. 17 miles) 19

9.7       Walmart – Gorham, NH (apx. 18 miles) 19

 

10        Restaurants (in near to far order) 20

10.1     North Country Family Restaurant – Groveton, NH (apx, 9 miles) 20

10.2     Stones Pizza – Groveton, NH (apx, 9 miles) 20

10.3     Everybody’s Place – Northumberland, NH (apx. 11 miles) 21

10.4     Scorpio’s Restaurant – Lancaster, NH (apx. 18 miles) 21

10.5     Puleo’s Restaurant and Lounge – Lancaster, NH (apx. 18 miles) 21

10.6     Joshua’s Grille – Lancaster, NH (apx. 18.5 miles) 22

10.7     J’s Corner Restaurant and Lounge – Gorham, NH (apx. 19 miles) 22

10.8     Gorham Dynasty Buffet – Gorham, NH (apx. 19 miles) 23

10.9     Yokohama Restaurant – Gorham, NH (apx. 19 miles) 23

10.10       Libby’s Bistro – Gorham, NH (apx. 19 miles) 23

 

11        Gift and Antique Shops (in near to far order) 24

11.1     Potato Barn Antique Center – Northumberland, NH (apx. 14 miles) 24

11.2     Fullers Sugarhouse – Lancaster, NH (apx. 18 miles) 24

11.3     Lancaster Farmers Market – Lancaster, NH (apx. 18 miles) 24

11.4     Two Nations Herb and Gift Shop – Lancaster, NH (apx. 18 miles) 24

11.5     Northern Reflections – Lancaster, NH (apx. 18 miles) 25

11.6     Tara – Gorham, NH (apx. 20 miles) 25

11.7     North Conway Antiques – North Conway, NH (apx. 52 miles) 25

 

12        Movie Theatres and Performing Arts. 26

12.1     Princess Theatre – Berlin, NH (apx. 14 miles)  Note: May not open for 2011 season. 26

12.2     Rialto Cinema – Lancaster, NH (apx. 18 miles) 26

12.3     Weathervane Theatre – Whitefield, NH (apx. 22 miles) 26

 

13        Ski Areas (in near to far order) 27

13.1     Wildcat Mountain – Pinkham Notch, NH  (apx. 35 miles) 27

13.2     Bretton Woods Ski Area – Bretton Woods, NH  (apx. 39 miles) 27

13.3     The Balsams Wilderness – Dixville Notch, NH  (apx. 40 miles) 27

13.4     Cannon Mountain – Franconia Notch, NH  (apx. 43 miles) 28

 

 

 

 

 

 

14        Exploring The Area Around Two Lakes Lodge. 29

14.1     North Pond. 29

14.2     South Pond Recreation Area. 29

14.3     Hiking Trails. 29

14.4     Hidden Treasures. 29

14.5     Rocky Ponds. 30

14.6     Rocky Pond Trail 30

14.7     Fishing at South Pond. 31

 

15        Christine Lake and Phillips Brook Falls (apx. 3 miles) 32

15.1     Phillips Brook Falls. 32

 

16        Nash Stream State Forest (apx. 4 miles) 33

16.1     Winter Activities. 33

16.2     Summer Activities. 33

16.3     Percy Peaks Trail 33

16.4     Pond Brook Falls. 33

16.5     Sugarloaf Trail 34

16.6     Nash Stream Bog. 34

 

17        Jericho Mountain State Park (apx. 12 miles) 35

 

18        Weeks State Park (apx. 20 miles) 36

 

19        Covered Bridge Mini-Tour 37

19.1     History of Covered Bridges. 37

19.2     List of Bridges (in near to far order) 38

19.2.1      Stark Bridge – Stark, NH (apx. 3 miles) 38

19.2.2      Groveton Bridge – Groveton, NH (apx. 8 miles) 38

19.2.3      Mt. Orne Bridge – Lancaster, NH (apx. 18 miles) 39

19.2.4      Mechanic Street Bridge – Lancaster, NH (apx. 18 miles) 39

19.2.5      Columbia Bridge - Columbia, NH (apx. 28 miles) 40

19.2.6      Pittsburg-Clarksville Bridge – Pittsburg, NH (apx. 46 miles) 40

19.2.7      Happy Corner Bridge – Pittsburg, NH (apx. 46 miles) 40

19.2.8      River Road Bridge – Pittsburg, NH (apx. 46 miles) 41

 

20        Grand Resort Hotel Tour 42

20.1     History of The Grand Resort Hotels. 42

20.2     The Grand Resort Hotels of Today (in near to far order) 42

20.2.1      Mountain View Grand - Whitefield, NH (apx 23 miles) 43

20.2.2      Mountain Washington Hotel - Bretton Woods, NH (apx 39 miles) 45

20.2.3      The Cog Railway - Bretton Woods, NH (apx 39 miles) 47

20.2.4      The Balsams Hotel - Dixville Notch, NH (apx. 40 miles) 48

 

 

 

21        Theme Parks and Attractions  (in near to far order) 50

21.1     Riverside Speedway - Groveton, NH (apx. 10 miles) 50

21.2     Six Gun City and Fort Splash - Jefferson, NH (apx. 23 miles) 50

21.3     Santa’s Village - Jefferson, NH (apx. 23 miles) 51

21.4     Mount Washington Auto Road – Gorham, NH (apx. 28 miles) 51

21.5     The Cog Railway - Bretton Woods, NH (apx. 41 miles) 51

21.6     Cannon Mountain - Franconia Notch, NH (apx. 43 miles) 52

21.7     Wildcat Mountain - Jackson, NH (apx 45 miles) 52

21.8     Storyland - Glen, NH (apx 48 miles) 52

21.9     Heritage Museum - Glen, NH (apx 48 miles) 53

21.10       Conway Scenic Railway - North Conway, NH (apx 52 miles) 53

21.11       Attitash Bear Peak - Bartlett, NH (apx 53 miles) 53

21.12       Whales Tale Water Park - Lincoln, NH (apx 56 miles) 54

21.13       Hobo Railroad - Lincoln, NH (apx 56 miles) 54

21.14       Clarks Trading Post - Lincoln, NH (apx 57 miles) 54

21.15       Lost River Gorge - North Woodstock, NH (apx 57 miles) 55

 

22        Map of Parks, Attractions, Restaurants and Stores. 56

 

 

 


 

1          Contact Information

 

 

1.1         Welcome

 

Welcome to Two Lakes Lodge!  We have prepared this guide to help you plan your vacation and to make your stay at the lodge as comfortable as possible.  We encourage you to read through the first 8 chapters (16 pages) of the guide, which are devoted to getting to the Lodge, door access, light controls, heat/AC controls and sound system controls.

 

The remainder of the guide lists restaurants, stores, outdoor recreation sites and family attractions that you may want to visit while you are at the Lodge.

 

We hope that you enjoy your stay with us and if there is any other information that you need during your visit, please feel free to call us at the numbers listed below.

 

1.2         Phone Numbers and Lodge Address

 

Owners: Larry and Kate Gomes . . . . . . . . . . 508-366-1172 (home) 

Larry’s cell phone                                             508-561-6398

Kate’s cell phone                                              508-439-1938

 

Lodge Address  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Kelly Road, Stark, NH 03582

Lodge Phone Number  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 603-636-1404

Emergency (Police, Fire, Ambulance)  . . . . . 911

 

1.3         Other Medical Related Information

 

Weeks Medical Center, 173 Middle Street, Lancaster, NH - 603-788-4911  (apx. 18 miles)

Androscoggin Valley Hospital, 59 Page Hill Road, Berlin, NH – 606-752-2200 (apx. 15 miles)

Nearest ambulance service: Groveton Fire Department (apx 9 miles) – 603-636-1450

Stark Fire Department (apx 3 miles) – 603-788-2722


 

2          Getting to Two Lakes Lodge

 

From Boston, MA and Points South

Take Rt. 93N to Concord, NH and follow the directions below: “From Concord, NH”.

 

From New York and Points South

Take Rt. 84N to Hartford, CT and then take Rt. 91N to St. Johnsbury, VT.  Take Rt. 93S to the first exit (about 3 miles) and the follow Rt. 2 East to Lancaster, NH.  Follow the directions below: “From Lancaster, NH”.

 

From Concord, NH:

RT 93 N thru Concord and Plymouth and into Franconia Notch.

 

IMPORTANT: Right after passing Franconia Notch and the Cannon Mountain Ski Area, TAKE THE EXIT FOR RT3 NORTH TO TWIN MOUNTAIN!  Follow Rt. 3N to Twin Mountain, Whitefield, and Lancaster (about 30 miles).

 

BE CAUTIOUS IN THESE SMALL TOWNS, SINCE THE POLICE USUALLY HAVE RADAR TRAPS SET UP.

 

From Lancaster, NH:

From Lancaster, NH take Rt. 3N about 10 miles to Groveton, NH. As you enter Groveton, look for Rt. 110E on the Right.  Follow Rt. 110E to Stark Center (6 miles).  About 2 miles past Stark Center, you will see a sign for South Pond on your right.  Follow the directions below: “From Rt. 110 in Stark, NH”.

 

From Maine and Points East

Head for Gorham, NH and take Rt. 16N to Berlin, NH.  In Berlin, NH follow the signs to Rt. 110W.  Keep A Close Watch Since There Are Several Turns In Berlin To Get To Rt. 110W! About 11 miles from Berlin, you will pass a gas station and country store on your right in the Town of West Milan.  4 miles past this gas station, look for South Pond road on your left.  Follow the directions below: “From Rt. 110 in Stark, NH”.

 

From Rt. 110 in Stark, NH

Follow South Pond Road about ¾ mile and you will see the entrance to the South Pond National Park Recreation area on your right.  Bypass this entrance and road turns to gravel. Continue on the main road until you see a “Y” intersection with a Yellow “Dead End” sign. Take the left fork, which is Kelly Road.  Follow Kelly Road past apx. 15 houses and camps and you will see Two Lakes Lodge on the right.  It is the only log house with an attached two-car garage.


 

3          Local Road Information

 

Note: ATV’s are not permitted on the roads or trails in and around the Lodge.  In the winter, snowmobiles are permitted to access the local trail system from the Lodge.

 

3.1         South Pond Road

The road leading into the Lodge from Rt. 110 is privately maintained and may require a 4-wheel drive vehicle for winter access.  We can have the road sanded if conditions are icy, but prior notification is needed.  The worst part of the road is at the very beginning (near Rt. 110) where the road goes up hill and through a sharp S-turn.  After that the road levels out and can be easily negotiated.  Note: The first part of South Pond Road is paved, then it turns into a gravel road.

 

3.2         Kelly Road

Kelly Road is a private gravel road maintained by the homeowners around the lake.  In many places, it is only wide enough for one car to pass.  Please be courteous to oncoming traffic and pull off whenever possible to let others by.  We respectfully request that you drive slowly in the summer to keep the road dust down and prevent accidents with children who often play in the road.  Complaints from our neighbors will be taken seriously.

 

3.3         Driving With The Locals

The pace of life in northern NH is much more deliberate than “down south”.  The county where the Lodge is located, Coos County, (Coos is pronounced Co-hoss) is the size of the State of Rhode Island with only 30,000 people in it.  You can count the traffic lights in Coos County on two hands!  Therefore, locals drive more courteously and are apt to give you the right of way at an intersection.

 

During your stay at the Lodge, we ask that you be courteous to your fellow drivers.  Do your best to reverse our reputation as “aggressive southern” drivers and adopt a more relaxed driving style while you are visiting in northern NH.  After all, you are on vacation!

 

3.4         Moose – Real or Imagined Threat?

As you enter northern NH, you will see signs warning you about moose crossing the road.  You may be inclined to ignore these warnings, but that would be a grave mistake.  On Rt. 110, just a few miles from the Lodge there have been several accidents involving moose. 

 

In one accident a moose ran out in front of our town fire truck and was hit in broad daylight.  It pushed the front of the engine compartment in a couple of feet and totaled the entire truck. 

 

In another accident, a person was driving to work in a small car and a moose jumped out in front of him.  He hit the legs of the moose and the body ended up on the roof of the car, completely crushing the passenger compartment and severely injuring the driver.  It took almost a year for him to recover from his injuries.

 

Please take it easy, especially at night and early in the morning when moose are likely to be out looking for food.  Do not approach moose since their actions can be very unpredictable.


 

4          Access Instructions

 

Access to and from the Lodge is controlled via an electronic lock system.  In its normal operating mode, you will see a red LED light at the top of the keypad.  If this LED is not lit, then it means the lock system has lost power and may not work.  (This is highly unlikely since the lock system has two levels of backup power).  If the lock system will not operate, then you must call the owner so a key can be provided to you.

 

4.1         Entering the Lodge

 

As you approach the front door, you will see a numeric keypad.  Type in your access code FOLLOWED BY THE STAR “*” KEY.  You will have 3 seconds to push in on the door to gain access to the Lodge. The door handle will remain locked, but the door will open if you push gently on it. Your access number will work at the both the street-side and lakeside access doors.   NOTE: Your access number will only be active on the days that you are scheduled to stay at the lodge.

 

4.2         Leaving the Lodge at the End of Your Visit

 

Close and lock all of the windows and doors and make sure that all exterior doors are locked. After closing and locking the front door, enter the code “9999” FOLLOWED BY THE STAR “*” KEY.  This will turn off all interior lights, set the heat/AC levels and activate the alarm system.  Entering “9999” only needs to be done at the end of your stay!  NOTE: The alarm system will be automatically deactivated when you enter your access code as you are entering the Lodge.

 

 


5          Lighting and Fan Controls

 

All of the lighting at the Lodge is controlled through computerized switches.  These switches can be controlled by the central computer system or by the light switch itself.  There are two distinct lighting modes: Automatic Mode and Scene Mode. The lighting system defaults to Automatic mode.

 

5.1         Automatic Lighting Mode

In this mode, lights in common passageway areas such as entrances, halls, stairs, etc. will automatically turn on when you enter that area.  If the light is not turned off manually, then it will turn off automatically after 5 to 15 minutes of inactivity depending on the area. 

 

To activate Automatic Lighting Mode, locate the scene switch on the right side of the Great Room facing the lake.  There are 4 switches.  The last switch is labeled  “AUTO”.  Turn this switch on to activate Automatic Lighting Mode.  Now as you walk through the Lodge, stairway and hall lights will automatically turn on to light your way.

 

5.2         Using The Light Switches

The light switches are touch-sensitive at the top and bottom of the switch.  Touch the top of the light switch to turn the light on.  If the light was previously dimmed, the light will come onto the prior dimmed setting.  To turn on the lights to full brightness, touch the top of the light switch twice.  To turn lights off, touch the bottom of the light switch once.

 

5.3         Scene Lighting Mode

The Lodge is equipped with several scene lighting switches that control multiple lights within an area.  These scenes switches are located in the Master Bedroom, Great Room, Kitchen/Dining Room, the Game Room and the mudroom (lower garage).  For example, in the Great Room, there are three scenes: 1-All lights on, 2-All lights dimmed 50% and 3-Dim lights for TV viewing and 4-Fireplace Log On.  Once a scene has been set, the timeout for inactivity is extended to one hour (instead of 15 minutes).  Also if other lights automatically turn on within the scene area, they will be set to match current scene brightness levels.  Note:  After pressing a scene switch, it usually takes 2 or 3 seconds for the lights to respond.

 

5.4         Outdoor Lights

The Lodge has three types of outdoor lights: Spotlights, Soffit Lights and Wall Sconces.  Since the area around the Lodge does not have any streetlights, it is very dark on cloudy or moonless nights.  We installed a variety of lights so you could adjust the outdoor lighting to your needs. 

 

If a lot of light is needed, you can turn on all of the outdoor lights.  This will light up the sides of the Lodge, the porch, deck, and patio as well as a 50’ circle of light around the entire Lodge. 

 

Otherwise the Soffit lights and Wall Sconces can be used to create a variety of lighting effects. Several pre-programmed outdoor scenes are available from the scene switch next to the mudroom entrance in the lower garage.

 

5.5         Spot Lights

The spotlights are located at all corners of the Lodge and along the lakeside of the Lodge.  One or more of these spotlights can be activated from any room in the house. The idea is if you hear a noise outside, you can easily light up the adjacent outside area by using the nearest spotlight switch.  These lights will also automatically turn on when activity is detected after the security system is activated (when you are leaving the lodge).

 

5.6         Soffit Lights

The Soffit lights are used as accent lights to showcase the Lodge while you are out around the grounds.  These are soft lights that shine down from the roof overhangs washing the sides of the Lodge in a pale glow.  There are two different sets of Soffit lights, one for the street side of the Lodge and one for the lakeside.

 

5.7         Wall Sconces

The Wall Sconces are located around the doorway areas of the Lodge.  On the street side of the Lodge, they are called “Porch Lights”.  On the upper floor lakeside of the Lodge, they are called “Deck Lights” and on the lower floor lakeside of the Lodge, they are called “Patio Lights”.  The main purpose of these lights is to light up the entrances to the Lodge and for deck and patio illumination.

 

5.8         Using the Fan Switches

Fan switches can be turned on by pressing once at the BOTTOM of the switch and turned off by pressing it again.  Fan switches have a lit LED indicator to show when they are on.  Note: In the winter, the ceiling fans in the upper level should be left on at all times to circulate heated air.

 

5.9         Bathroom Fans

Note:  The automatic switch for the upper level bathroom fan control is not working, so this fan can only be turned on manually at this time.

The bathroom fan switches are set to automatically turn on when excess moisture is detected.  Moisture is detected using a humidity sensor located near the showers stalls in each of the bathrooms.  The exhaust fan will stay on as long as sensor is detecting moisture levels that exceed the sensor readings. 

 

If you open the Lodge windows on a humid day, it is possible these fans will turn on.  In this event, increase the level of the moisture sensors from their normal range of 40% - 50% to 50% - 60%.  Then try to turn off the exhaust fan.  If the fan stays off, then you have increased the sensor sufficiently to compensate for the humid conditions.

 

These fans will automatically turn off 5 minutes after moisture levels return to normal.  If a bathroom fan is turned on manually, it will be automatically turned off after 5 minutes (providing the moisture level in the bathroom is normal).

Note: One of our goals in the Lodge is to try and keep the humidity and temperature levels fairly constant to keep the logs from cracking.  Therefore we encourage you to use the heating and air conditioning to keep the Lodge at a comfortable temperature and humidity level.

 

6          Heat and Air Conditioning Controls

 

There are two separate heating systems in the Lodge.  The upper level system is a hot air system with automatic humidifier.  The lower level system is a radiant heat system that heats the entire lower level floor.  In the winter, both of these systems are used to heat the Lodge.  In the summer, the lower level system is used to keep the lower level floor at a constant 68 degrees while the upper level system provides Air Conditioning to both floors.

 

Note: One of our goals in the Lodge is to try and keep the humidity and temperature levels fairly constant to keep the logs from cracking.  Therefore we encourage you to use the heating and air conditioning system to keep the Lodge at a comfortable temperature and humidity level.

 

6.1         Upper Level Control

A thermostat located in the hall near the master bedroom controls the upper level HVAC system.  This thermostat has 4 buttons on it:

 

Top Button:

Mode – Controls Heat/AC or turns unit off.  In the winter, please leave set to “H”.  In the summer, you can switch this to “C” for air conditioning as needed.  Please note that the summers in New Hampshire can be very warm during the day and very cold at night, so you may end up using both heating and air conditioning in the same day.  If you turn the Mode to “0”, then the HVAC system will turn off completely.  If you turn the Mode to “A”, then the HVAC system will automatically cycle between heat and AC (The “A” setting is not recommended since it is too sensitive to temperature changes and will alternate between heat and AC).

 

Middle Two Buttons:

Up and Down Temperature Control.  Press the up or down button ONE TIME to see the set point temperature.  To change the set point, press the up or down button TWO TIMES and the set point temperature will change by one degree.  After a few seconds, the thermostat will return to its normal display of the current temperature. In the winter, the normal set point for this thermostat is 67-70 degrees.  In the summer, the normal set point for this thermostat is 72-74 degrees.

 

Bottom Button:

Fan – Turns the circulator fan off or on.  When the circulator fan is on, it will show a dot between the first and second digit of the temperature on the thermostat. The fan should be left in the OFF position (no dot showing), since it will automatically turn on when needed by the heater or air conditioner.


 

6.2         Lower Level Control

A thermostat located in the hall near the lower level bathroom controls the lower level heating system.  Unlike the upper level system, this system only provides heat (not air conditioning).  This thermostat has 4 buttons on it:

 

Top Button:

Mode – Controls Heat or turns unit off.  In both the winter and summer, please leave this set to “H” since we keep the lower level floor at a constant temperature.  There is no air conditioning controlled by the lower thermostat so please do not use the “H” or “A” setting on this thermostat.

 

Middle Two Buttons:

Up and Down Temperature Control.  Press the up or down button ONE TIME to see the set point temperature.  To change the set point, press the up or down button TWO TIMES and the set point temperature will change by one degree.  After a few seconds, the thermostat will return to its normal display of the current temperature. In the winter, the normal set point for this thermostat is 70 degrees.  In the summer, the normal set point for this thermostat is 68 degrees.

 

Note 1: The lower level heating system responds very slowly to temperature set point changes since it must heat the entire floor slab before a noticeable change in temperature occurs.  A one or two degree temperature increase can take an hour to register on the thermostat.

Note 2: The temperature sensor for the lower level heating system is located on the linen closet in the lower level bathroom.  Opening the bathroom window will cause this sensor to read artificially lower temperatures and thus cause the slab to heat up.  We recommend not opening the bathroom window, especially during the winter months to avoid this problem.

 

Bottom Button:

Fan – Turns the circulator fan off or on.  Since the lower level heating system does not have a circulator fan, this switch does nothing.  When the circulator fan switch is on, it will show a dot between the first and second digit of the temperature on the thermostat. The fan switch should be left in the OFF position (no dot showing).


7          Pellet Stove, Fireplace and Generator

 

In the unlikely event of a failure of one or both of the gas heating systems, the pellet stove on the lower level can be used to comfortably heat the Lodge.  As part of your rental agreement, you have agreed not to operate the pellet stove without the permission of the owner.  You will be granted permission only after you have received detailed instructions in its operation.

 

7.1         Pellet Stove

The pellet stove is only used during the winter heating season and should not be started unless you have received permission AND detailed instructions from the owner. If the pellet stove is running when you arrive, then you can keep it running by dumping a bag of wood pellets into the TOP COVER of the Pellet Stove.  NOTE: Never load pellets into the burn chamber since they are automatically fed into the burn chamber by an auger.  Pellets are located in the lower garage and one bag is burned every 24 hours.  If you do not want to use the pellet stove, it will automatically turn off when it runs out of pellets (max 48 hours).

IMPORTANT: DO NOT UNPLUG THE STOVE OR CHANGE ANY OF THE SETTINGS WITHOUT PERMISSION OF THE OWNER.

 

7.2         Fireplace

In the upper level, there is a fireplace that is set up with an electric log.  This log provides the visual effects of a fire but does not provide any heat.  This log can be turned off or on from a switch located on the wall opposite from the fireplace.  Do not attempt to remove this log since it is hardwired into the electrical system of the Lodge.

 

7.3         Generator

The lodge is equipped with a backup generator that will automatically turn on if the power fails.  It also automatically turns on for 15 minutes on Saturday at 10:00 am.  Please keep children away from the generator at all times.


 

8          Sound System

 

Two Lakes Lodge has a state-of-the-art sound system with ceiling speakers in almost every room.   In addition to providing music, this system can also provide weather information.

 

8.1         Sound System Keypads

To turn on the keypad, press the power switch one time (located in the lower left hand corner) of the keypad and the unit will respond with “Hello”.  Now you can press the “Source” button to select from one of the following sources: 

 

Satellite 1         – Upper level satellite receiver

Satellite 2         – Lower level satellite receiver

FM                  – FM receiver with preset stations

MP3                – Audiotron MP3 Player located in the Great Room

 

For example, to hear music from one of the satellite receivers, go to the upper or lower satellite receiver and set the receiver to the station that you want to listen to using the satellite remote control.  Music stations are on channels 900 to 999.   Once you have your favorite music channel selected, you can turn the TV off, but leave the satellite receiver on. 

 

Return to the keypad and choose Satellite 1 (for the upper level receiver) or Satellite 2 (for the lower level receiver).  Use the keypad volume controls (in the lower right hand corner) to adjust the volume up or down. 

 

Please note the following keypad locations and the speakers that are controlled by those keypads:

 

1. Great Room Keypad

Great room ceiling speakers

2. Kitchen Keypad

Kitchen and deck speakers (summer only)

3. Master Bedroom Keypad

Master bedroom and master bathroom speakers

4. Game Room Keypad

Game room and ping pong room speakers

5. Blue Bedroom Keypad

Blue bedroom ceiling speakers

6. Green Bedroom Keypad

Green bedroom ceiling speakers

 

8.2         FM Receiver

When the FM setting on the keypad is selected, you can change stations using the right arrow or left arrow keys.  Unfortunately FM reception is very poor due to the mountains that surround the Lodge and the lack of a good antenna. 

8.3         Audiotron MP3 Music Player

Two Lakes Lodge has a comprehensive library of music stored as MP3 files on a central server.  To access this music, you need to use the Turtle Beach Audiotron player located in the Great Room. 

 

Before using the Audiotron, turn on the sound system keypad in the Great Room and select source “MP3” so that you can monitor the selections you will be making with the Audiotron.  Once your selections have been made, you can turn off the Great Room speakers (if you want) and listen in other parts of the Lodge.

 

Checking Audiotron Power

If the display does not show the current time, be sure the power switch on the back of the Audiotron is on and then press the I/O button on the front face.  The Audiotron will then power itself up by finding the music server and loading up the menu data, a process that takes about 5-6 minutes.

 

Accessing Menu Selections

The right hand round knob on the Audiotron is used as a selector switch AND as an enter switch.  Turning this knob selects the options on the display and pushing the knob acts as an “Enter” button to select the currently highlighted option.  Important: To return to the main menu, press the button on the left side of the Audiotron with a square on it two times.

 

Selecting by Artist

From the main option menu, there are several selections including “Artist”.  Turn the selector button until “Artist” has been highlighted.  Then press the selector button in one time and a list of artists will be displayed.  Scroll through the artist list by turning the selector button and push the selector button in for the desired artist.  You can now play all songs for that artist, or select an album for that artist or select a song for that artist. 

 

Selecting by Mood

From the main option menu, turn the option button until “Lists” has been highlighted and then press the selector button in one time.  Now use the selector button to select the entry “Generate Playlist Based on Song” and press the selector button in one time.  The Audiotron will now tell you to select a song. 

 

You have one minute to return to the menu (by pressing the square button two times) and to select a song.  For example, select by Artist, then select the song “Midnight Rider”.  The Audiotron will respond by starting to play “Midnight Rider”, but then some custom software along with a package called “Mood Logic” will be used to search all of the songs in our database for songs with that same “mood”. 

 

These songs will then be assembled into a play list and then given back to the Audiotron.  Once the Audiotron receives the list, then it will start playing the first song you selected (ie: Midnight Rider), but you will notice that it will also say this is song 1 of nn songs.  (Usually between 10 and 30 songs are assembled into a play list).

 

If you do not select a song within one minute or the song that you select is not “Mood Rated”, then the mood selection process will fail and you must start over again.  If you are interested in finding out more about the mood selection feature, please check out www.moodlogic.com

 

8.4         Weather Forecast and Current Weather

 

Since getting a good forecast in the mountains from the weather channel is next to impossible, the Lodge has two ways for you to check on the weather.

 

First the Lodge has its own weather station installed on the roof of the Lodge.  This weather station uploads temperature and wind conditions to the www.twolakeslodge.com web site that you can access by clicking on the link at the bottom of the “Maps” page.  You can check this page before you leave home to get an idea of the temperature differences between you house and the Lodge.

 

While you are at the Lodge, you can also access the Lodge weather station from any sound system keypad.  Simply turn the keypad on and press the F1 key for the current temperature, wind direction, wind speed and wind chill.

 

To get the latest forecast, press the F2 button.  This forecast is downloaded from the National Weather Service at 4:00am and 4:00pm every day and then turned into a sound file by some text-to-speech software so it can be read to you over the sound system.


9          Grocery, Department and Hardware Stores (in near to far order)

 

Many of the stores in the North Country change their hours at various times of the year.  We highly recommend calling in advance to insure the store will be open when you get there.

 

9.1         Gord’s Corner Store – West Milan, NH (apx. 4 miles)

A small convenience store with gas, diesel, beer, wine, snacks, pizza and some basic household items.  The also have hunting and fishing supplies, licenses, registrations and bait. 

Closest gas station to the Lodge.

Location/Phone: Rt. 110, West Milan, NH – 603-449-2236

Hours: 6:00am - 7:00pm 7 days a week

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west for 4 miles and you will see the store on your left.

 

9.2         Groveton Market – Groveton, NH (apx. 9 miles)

A medium sized grocery store with all the basic items.

Closest grocery store to the Lodge.

Location/Phone: 12 State Street, Groveton, NH – 603-636-2301

Hours: Mon-Thu 5:00am – 9:00pm, Fri –Sat 6:00am – 9:00pm, Sun 6:00am – 8:00pm

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 North, cross over bridge and bear right at the fork in the road.  Take a left onto State Street and Groveton Market is on the right two blocks north.

 

9.3         Perras ACE Hardware and Lumber  – Lancaster, NH (apx. 9 miles)

A large hardware store and lumber yard. 

Closest hardware store to the Lodge.

Location/Phone: Rt. 3, Lancaster, NH – 603-636-1391

Hours: Mon-Sat 7:00am – 5:00pm, Sun 8:00am – 5:00pm

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South for 7 miles and look for the Perras sign on your right just before Everybody’s Restaurant.

 

9.4         Shaw’s Supermarket – Lancaster, NH (apx. 18 miles)

A large grocery store with a full service deli counter and bakery.

Location/Phone: Rt. 3, Lancaster, NH – 603-788-4065

Hours: 7:00am - 10:00pm 7 days a week

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South 10 miles to Lancaster.  Shaw’s is on the left about 1/3 mile past McDonalds.

 

9.5         Berlin IGA Foodliner - Berlin, NH (apx. 15 miles)

A medium size grocery store with most of the essential items.

Location/Phone: Rt. 16, Berlin, NH – 603-752-1050

Hours: Mon-Sat 8:00am – 9:00pm, Sun 8:00am – 6:00pm

Directions: Take Rt. 110 east about 14 miles to Berlin.  You will pass by the Berlin Police Station and go under a small railroad bridge and come to a light.  At that light, take a right, which will bring you to Rt. 16 South.  Follow Rt. 16 South a few blocks and you will see the IGA Foodliner on your Right. 

Note: When returning to Stark, be sure to follow the Rt. 110 signs carefully since it is easy to get lost in the center of Berlin.

 

9.6         Save-A-Lot - Gorham, NH (apx. 17 miles)

A medium size grocery store with a limited selection of items that most customers normally purchase.  (Similar to a wholesale store like BJ’s or Sam’s Club).

Location/Phone: Rt. 16 between Berlin and Gorham, NH – 603-752-1248

Hours: Mon-Sat 8:00am – 8:00pm, Sun 8:00am – 6:00pm

Directions: Take Rt. 110 east about 14 miles to Berlin.  You will pass by the Berlin Police Station and go under a small railroad bridge and come to a light.  At that light, take a right, which will bring you to Rt. 16 South.  Follow Rt. 16 South three miles and you will see the Save-A-Lot on your Right. 

Note: When returning to Stark, be sure to follow the Rt. 110 signs carefully since it is easy to get lost in the center of Berlin.

 

9.7         Walmart – Gorham, NH (apx. 18 miles)

A large department store with a large food section containing a comprehensive selection of merchandise.

Closest department store to the Lodge.

Location/Phone:  Rt. 16 between Berlin and Gorham – 603-752-4621

Hours: 7:00am – 9:00pm Mon-Sat, 7:00am – 6:00pm Sun

Directions: Take Rt. 110 east about 14 miles to Berlin.  You will pass by the Berlin Police Station and go under a small railroad bridge and come to a light.  At that light, take a right, which will bring you to Rt. 16 South.  Follow Rt. 16 South about 4 miles and you will see Walmart on your Right. 

Note: When returning to Stark, be sure to follow the Rt. 110 signs carefully since it is easy to get lost in the center of Berlin.


 

10     Restaurants (in near to far order)

 

Many of the restaurants in the North Country change their hours at various times of the year.  We highly recommend calling in advance to insure they will be open when you get there.  Also, please check our book of sample menus at the Lodge for an idea of selection and prices.

 

 

10.1     North Country Family Restaurant – Groveton, NH (apx, 9 miles)

Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner, this restaurant features great food at very reasonable prices.

Location/Phone:  12 Main Street, Groveton, NH – 603-636-1511

Breakfast – Eggs, toast, omelets, pancakes, French toast, home fries.

Lunch – Soups, salads, burgers, dogs, fries, sandwiches, fried seafood, subs and pizza.

Dinner – Soups, salads, seafood, chicken, steak, spaghetti, daily specials.  (Dinner prices range from $8.95 - $18.95)

Hours: Open 7 days 7:00am – 8:00pm

Dress Code: Very Casual

Our Rating: Very Good

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 North, cross over bridge and bear right at the fork in the road (next intersection).  Cross through next intersection and North Country Family Restaurant is on the left.

 

10.2     Stones Pizza – Groveton, NH (apx, 9 miles)

A pizza and sub shop with that has an in-house seating area or take out service.

Location/Phone:  19 State Street, Groveton, NH – 603-636-2205

Menu: Small, large and party size pizzas, sandwiches, subs, wings, chicken fingers, potato skins, onion rings. (Pizza prices range from $5.35 - $18.20) (Our Rating: Very Good)

Hours: Mon-Wed 11:00am – 9:00pm, Thu-Sat 11:00am – 10:00pm, Sun 12:00pm – 8:00pm)

Dress Code: Very Casual

Our Rating: Very Good for pizza, Good for subs

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 North, cross over bridge and bear right at the fork in the road (next intersection), then left onto State Street.  Stone’s Pizza is on the right.


 

10.3     Everybody’s Place – Northumberland, NH (apx. 11 miles)

A family style restaurant offering dinner specials every night of the week. Also has an ice cream window that is open late.

Location/Phone:  Rt. 3 South of Groveton Center – 603-636-1213

Breakfast – Eggs, toast, omelets, pancakes, French toast, home fries.

Lunch – Soups, salads, burgers, dogs, fries, sandwiches, onion rings, and deserts.

Dinner – Soups, salads, burgers dogs, fries, seafood, chicken, steak, spaghetti, daily specials, deserts (Dinner prices range from $7:50 - $14.95).

Hours:  Sun 6:00am – 3:00pm,  Mon – Wed:  5:00am – 2:00pm, Thu – Sat:  5:00am – 8:00pm

Ice Cream Hours: Everyday 12:00pm to 8:00pm

Dress Code: Very Casual

Our Rating: Very Good.

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South about 3 miles.  Look for Everybody’s Place on the right.

 

10.4     Scorpio’s Restaurant – Lancaster, NH (apx. 18 miles)

A pub style restaurant and sports bar serving lunch and dinner with a southwest flavor.

Location/Phone:  Rt. 2, Lancaster Center – 603-788-3660

Menu: Pizza, wrap sandwiches, calzones, chicken, wings and burgers.

(Prices range from $4.25 - $17.10).

Hours:  Sun-Thu 11:00am – 9:00pm, Fri-Sat 11:00am – 10:00pm

Dress Code: Very Casual

Our Rating: Excellent.  Their wraps are the best and they make an excellent margarita.

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South about 9 miles to Lancaster center.  Look for Scorpios on the right 1/8 mile past McDonalds.

 

10.5     Puleo’s Restaurant and Lounge – Lancaster, NH (apx. 18 miles)

An family-style restaurant serving lunch and dinner with some home-made sauces.

Location/Phone:  Rt. 2, just East of Lancaster Center – 603-788-3088

Menu: Steak, seafood, chicken, pasta, soups, salads, sandwiches, burgers.

( Lunch prices range from $4.95 - $9.95, dinner prices range from $9.95 - $17.95).

Hours: 11:00am – 9:00pm 7 days a week

Dress Code: Casual

Our Rating: Very Good

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South about 9 miles to Lancaster center.  Just as you are about to leave Lancaster Center, Puleo’s is on the right.


 

10.6     Joshua’s Grille – Lancaster, NH (apx. 18.5 miles)

A full service restaurant set in an 1800’s farmhouse serving lunch and dinner.  Dinner reservations are recommended.

Location/Phone:  39 Portland Street (Rt. 2), Lancaster – 603-788-3939

Lunch Hours: Tue-Sun 11:30am – 2:00pm

Dinner Hours: Thur-Sat 5:00pm – 8:30pm

Menu: Their menu offers everything from fine dining to comfort food at reasonable prices. Lots of homemade dishes, soups and sauces. (Prices range from $4.95 – $19.95).

Dress Code: Casual

Our Rating: Very Good.

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South about 9 miles to Lancaster Center.  Go past the center of town and take a left onto Rt. 2 East.  Look for Joshua’s Grille on your right about ¼ down Rt. 2.

 

10.7     J’s Corner Restaurant and Lounge – Gorham, NH (apx. 19 miles)

A full service restaurant and lounge specializing in grilled steak and seafood with full bar in a family restaurant setting.  Also features live bands (hard rock) on weekends.

Location/Phone:  Rt. 16 in Gorham Center – 603-466-5132

Menu: Soups, salads, burgers dogs, fries, seafood, chicken, steak, chops, pasta, daily specials, deserts (Prices range from $4.95 – $15.95)

Hours: Sun-Thu 10:30am - 9:00pm, Fri-Sat 10:30am - 10:00pm

Dress Code: Casual

Our Rating: Excellent.  Especially good for seafood, steak and pasta.

Directions: Take Rt. 110 east about 14 miles to Berlin.  You will pass by the Berlin Police Station and go under a small railroad bridge and come to a light.  At that light, take a right, which will bring you to Rt. 16 South.  Follow Rt. 16 South about 5 miles (past Walmart) into Gorham Center and you will see J’s Corner Restaurant on your Right. 

Note: When returning to Stark, be sure to follow the Rt. 110 signs carefully since it is easy to get lost in the center of Berlin.


 

10.8     Gorham Dynasty Buffet – Gorham, NH (apx. 19 miles)

A Chinese restaurant with full liquor license offering and lunch and dinner buffet with over 100 items.

Location/Phone:  Rt. 16 in Gorham Center – 603-466- 9888

Menu: Extensive buffet menu including appetizers, entries and deserts. (Lunch price is $5.95 and dinner price is $10.25).

Hours: Mon-Thu 11:00am – 9:00pm, Fri-Sat 11:00am-10:00pm, Sun 11:30am -9:00pm

Dress Code: Casual

Our Rating: Lunch and Dinner buffet: Excellent

Directions: Take Rt. 110 east about 14 miles to Berlin.  You will pass by the Berlin Police Station and go under a small railroad bridge and come to a light.  At that light, take a right, which will bring you to Rt. 16 South.  Follow Rt. 16 South about 5 miles (past Walmart) into Gorham Center and you will see the Gorham Dynasty Buffet Restaurant on your Left. 

Note: When returning to Stark, be sure to follow the Rt. 110 signs carefully since it is easy to get lost in the center of Berlin.

 

10.9     Yokohama Restaurant – Gorham, NH (apx. 19 miles)

A Japanese restaurant and lounge serving a combination of Oriental and American cuisine.

Location/Phone:  Rt. 16 in Gorham Center – 603-466-2501

Hours: 11:00am – 9:00pm Tue-Sun, Closed Mon.

Dress Code: Casual

Our Rating: Very Good

Directions: Take Rt. 110 east about 14 miles to Berlin.  You will pass by the Berlin Police Station and go under a small railroad bridge and come to a light.  At that light, take a right, which will bring you to Rt. 16 South.  Follow Rt. 16 South about 5 miles (past Walmart) into Gorham Center and you will see the Yokohama Restaurant on your Left. 

Note: When returning to Stark, be sure to follow the Rt. 110 signs carefully since it is easy to get lost in the center of Berlin.

 

10.10 Libby’s Bistro – Gorham, NH (apx. 19 miles)

A romantic, eclectic restaurant set in an old bank building serving gourmet dishes you will not find anywhere else.  Call ahead, reservations are required.

Location/Phone:  Rt. 16 in Gorham Center – 603-466-5330

Menu: Totally creative dishes with fantastic sauces and artistic food presentation.

(Prices range from $15.00 to $25.00)

Hours: Dinner only, May through September, December and January.

Dress Code: Casual elegance

Our Rating: Absolutely the best restaurant north of New York City.  We just wish they were open more often.

Directions: Take Rt. 110 east about 14 miles to Berlin.  You will pass by the Berlin Police Station and go under a small railroad bridge and come to a light.  At that light, take a right, which will bring you to Rt. 16 South.  Follow Rt. 16 South about 5 miles (past Walmart) into Gorham Center.  Look for Libby’s on the right just past Wilfred’s Restaurant. 

Note: When returning to Stark, be sure to follow the Rt. 110 signs carefully since it is easy to get lost in the center of Berlin.

11     Gift and Antique Shops (in near to far order)

 

The list of shops below is not comprehensive, but is meant as a general guide. The towns that we have listed, Lancaster, Gorham, North Conway are havens for these types of shops and new shops have been known to spring up overnight. The best bet is to keep a watchful eye out in town centers to spot these types of shops.

 

11.1     Potato Barn Antique CenterNorthumberland, NH (apx. 14 miles)

A large antique store with a large variety of antique, furniture, old tools, books, glassware, vintage clothing, antique jewelry and old signs.

Closest antique shop to the Lodge.

Location/Phone:  Rt. 3, Between Groveton and Lancaster – 603-636-2611 

Hours –April thru December: Thu-Mon, 9;00am – 5:00pm, closed Tue-Wed, December thru March: Fri-Sun, 9:00am – 5:00pm, closed Mon-Thu

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South towards Lancaster.  The Potato Barn is on your right about 4 miles South of Groveton.

 

11.2     Fullers Sugarhouse – Lancaster, NH (apx. 18 miles)

A local sugarhouse that uses sap from maple trees in the Lancaster area to make several grades of syrup packaged in traditional and decorative bottles.

Location/Phone:  Rt. 3, Lancaster, NH – 603-788-2719

Web Site: www.nhmade.com/martinmeadowmaples

Hours – 9:30am – 5:00pm 7 days a week.

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South about 10 miles to Lancaster.  Look for Fuller’s Sugarhouse on your left, just across from McDonalds.

 

11.3     Lancaster Farmers Market – Lancaster, NH (apx. 18 miles)

Part food, part collectibles, part used stuff, the farmers market is a cross between a flea market and outdoor food market.

Location:  Rt. 3, Lancaster, NH

Hours – June thru September: Sat 9:00am – 12:00pm, Sun 9:00am – 4:00pm

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South about 10 miles to Lancaster Center.  Look for the farmers market in a park on your right.

 

11.4     Two Nations Herb and Gift Shop – Lancaster, NH (apx. 18 miles)

A gift shop specializing in Native American Art and holistic herbs.

Location/Phone:  89 Main St, Lancaster, NH – 603-788-0948 

Hours – Mon-Fri 9:30am – 5:00pm, Sat 10:00am –5:00pm, Sun 10:00am – 3:00pm

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South about 10 miles to Lancaster Center.  Look for the Two Nations shop on your left across from the movie theatre.


 

11.5     Northern Reflections – Lancaster, NH (apx. 18 miles)

A gift shop that specializes in selling and repairing stained glass items.  Also will build custom stained glass items.

Location/Phone:  81 Main St, Lancaster, NH – 603-788-4039 

Hours – Tue 10:00am – 4:30pm and 6:30pm – 9:30pm, Wed-Fri 10:00am – 5:00pm, Sat 10:00am – 4:00pm

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South about 10 miles to Lancaster Center.  Look for the Northern Reflections shop on your left across from the movie theatre.

 

11.6     Tara – Gorham, NH (apx. 20 miles)

This shop specializes in antique prints and maps. The maps focus on the White Mountains, with much of the material from around 1850. Some older state and county maps are also available.

Location/Phone:  60 Glen Rd., Gorham, NH – 603-466-2624

Hours – By appointment only

Directions: Take Rt. 110 east about 14 miles to Berlin.  You will pass by the Berlin Police Station and go under a small railroad bridge and come to a light.  At that light, take a right, which will bring you to Rt. 16 South.  Follow Rt. 16 South about 6 miles to Gorham Center.  Tara is on Rt. 16 just before the intersection of Rt. 2.

Note: When returning to Stark, be sure to follow the Rt. 110 signs carefully since it is easy to get lost in the center of Berlin.

 

11.7     North Conway Antiques – North Conway, NH (apx. 52 miles)

This is one of the largest group shops in Northern New England with displays from more than 75 dealers. You might find some genuine antiques, and you’ll definitely find a wide selection of collectibles.

Location/Phone:  Main St., North Conway, NH – 603-356-6661

Hours – 10:00am – 5:00pm 7 days a week
Directions: Take Rt. 110 east about 14 miles to Berlin.  You will pass by the Berlin Police Station and go under a small railroad bridge and come to a light.  At that light, take a right, which will bring you to Rt. 16 South.  Follow Rt. 16 South about 6 miles into Gorham then another 24 miles into Glen and then another 8 miles to North Conway.  Look for the antique shop at the junctions of Rt. 16 and Rt. 302.  (

Caution: In July and August, North Conway can be very congested during the day

Note: When returning to Stark, be sure to follow the Rt. 110 signs carefully since it is easy to get lost in the center of Berlin.

 


 

12     Movie Theatres and Performing Arts

 

12.1     Princess Theatre – Berlin, NH (apx. 14 miles)  Note:  May not be open for 2011 season -

Please call ahead!   The Princess Twin Cinema built in the early 1900’s.

Location/Phone:  Rt. 110, Berlin, NH – 603-752-3434

Website: http://www.tbatheatres.com/

Historical Notes: The Princess Theater was built during 1913-1914. In October of 1914, the Berlin Reporter had a story on Berlin's newest building. It said, “The theatre going public of Berlin would have the pleasure of attending one of the finest theatres in the state. In the planning and construction, no expense has been spared to make it as perfect as human ingenuity and skill could produce”.  It was closed in 1943 and remodeled and reopened in 1957 and eventually turned into a twin theatre in the 1970’s.

Directions: Take Rt. 110 east about 14 miles to Berlin.  You will pass by the Berlin Police Station and go under a small railroad bridge and come to a light.  Look straight ahead and you will see the Royal Cinema.  There is on-street parking and several municipal parking lots in this area. Note: When returning to Stark, be sure to follow the Rt. 110 signs carefully since it is easy to get lost in the center of Berlin.

 

12.2      Rialto Cinema – Lancaster, NH (apx. 18 miles)

Single Cinema built in the early 1900’s, which usually runs 2 movies selections at different show times.

Location/Phone:  Rt. 3, Lancaster, NH – 603-788-4499
Website: http://www.tbatheatres.com/

Historical Notes:  The Rialto was closed for several years and was renovated in 2001 and reopened in the Spring of 2002.

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South 10 miles to Lancaster center.  The Rialto is on the right about 1/2 mile past McDonalds.

 

12.3      Weathervane Theatre – Whitefield, NH (apx. 22 miles)

A professional theatre company presenting several shows during the summer season.

Location/Phone:  Rt. 3, Whitefield, NH - 603-837-9010

Web Site: www.weathervanetheatre.org

Hours: Matinee and evening shows from July to August.

Historical Notes:  With over 40 seasons, the Weathervane is the 3rd oldest continuously operating professional theatre in New Hampshire. Weathervane is New England's only summer theatre operating in a truly alternating repertory.  By opening three productions its first week, then dropping and adding productions as the season progresses, the closing two weeks

culminates with an alternating schedule of four and five titles from the season's playbill of seven.  The season runs from June through August. Call early as performances often sell out!

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South to Lancaster (apx 10 miles) and then toward Whitefield (apx 5 miles).  Between Lancaster and Whitefield, you will climb a large hill (Mt. Prospect/Weeks State Park) and then pass by a small car dealer on your left.  Just past the car dealer look for a large sign on your left that marks the entrance road to the Mountain View Hotel.  The Weathervane Theatre is on the right just past the entrance road to the Mountain View Hotel.


 

13     Ski Areas (in near to far order)

 

Two Lakes Lodge is centrally located between 4 different ski areas.  All of the areas can be reached within a 45-60 minute drive depending on weather conditions.

 

13.1     Wildcat Mountain – Pinkham Notch, NH  (apx. 35 miles)

Wildcat offers downhill skiing on 47 trails with great views of Mt. Washington just across the valley.  Also offers gondola rides during the summer and fall seasons.

Location: Rt. 16, Pinkham Notch, NH south of Gorham Center

Phone: 603-466-3326, Conditions: 888-SKI-WILD

Web Site: : www.skiwildcat.com

Directions: Take Rt. 110 east about 14 miles to Berlin. You will pass by the Berlin Police Station and go under a small railroad bridge and come to a light.  At that light, take a right, which will bring you to Rt. 16 South.  Follow Rt. 16 South about 7 miles (past Walmart) into Gorham Center.  Take a right after Gorham Center and continue to follow Rt. 16 about 13 miles to the ski area.

Note: When returning to Stark, be sure to follow the Rt. 110 signs carefully since it is easy to get lost in the center of Berlin.

 

13.2     Bretton Woods Ski Area – Bretton Woods, NH  (apx. 39 miles)

Advertised as the largest ski area in New Hampshire, Bretton Woods offers downhill skiing on 76 trails.  Its Nordic ski area has 100km of groomed cross-country trails with beautiful views of Mt. Washington and the Mt. Washington Grand Hotel.

Location: Rt. 302, Bretton Woods, NH East of Twin Mountain Center

Phone: 603-278-3320, Conditions: 603-278-3333

Web Site: www.brettonwoods.com

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South to Lancaster (apx 10 miles) and then through Whitefield to the stoplight Twin Mountain.  At the stoplight, take a left onto Rt. 302 east and travel about 5 miles to Bretton Woods. You will see the Bretton Woods ski area on your right.

 

13.3     The Balsams Wilderness – Dixville Notch, NH  (apx. 40 miles)

The Balsams offers downhill skiing on 16 trails, Nordic Skiing on 95km of groomed cross country trails and snow shoeing on 33km of specially designed snowshoe trails.  All of this activity takes place on their 15,000-acre resort within the shadow of one of New Hampshire’s Grand Hotels.

Location: Rt. 26, Dixville Notch, NH between Colebrook and Errol

Phone: 603-255-3400

Web Site: www.thebalsams.com

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 5 miles to Rt. 110a.  Take Rt. 110a north 4 miles to Rt. 16.  Take Rt. 16 North about 17 miles into Errol Center.  From Errol Center take Rt. 26 West to about 12 miles to Dixville Notch.  After descending from Dixville Notch, the Balsams Grand Hotel will be on your right and just past the hotel on the left is the Balsams Wilderness Ski Area.

 

13.4     Cannon Mountain – Franconia Notch, NH  (apx. 43 miles)

Cannon Mountain offers downhill skiing on 45 trails as well as a tubing park on weekends and holidays.  In the summer you can take a gondola ride to the top of the mountain and there is a bike path with bike rentals near the base lodge.

Location: Rt. 93, Franconia Notch, NH

Phone: 603-823-8800, Conditions: 603-823-7771

Web Site: www.cannonmt.com

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South to Lancaster (apx 10 miles) and then through Whitefield to Twin Mountain (another 16 miles).  Continue on Rt. 3 South past Twin Mountain to Rt. 93 South (apx 10 miles) and look for the signs for Cannon Mountain.

 

 


14     Exploring The Area Around Two Lakes Lodge

 

The locals generically refer to the area around the Lodge as “South Pond”.  In reality there are actually 5 lakes (or ponds), two large and 3 small.  Originally paper companies owned this land and they allowed people to lease land along some of the waterfront so they could build fishing camps and cottages.  Eventually the paper companies sold the land to the camp owners.  When the Federal Government purchased the land around these lakes to add to the White Mountain Forest, they left the camp owners land holdings in place and gave them permission to use the access road leading into the area.  As you look around, you can generally assume that all of the land not currently built on is part of the National Forest and will remain that way in the future.

 

14.1     North Pond

The Lodge is located on the northernmost lake, which is called North Pond.  North Pond is about 1/3 mile long and and 1/8 mile wide, and is flanked on the East and the West by 1,500+ foot peaks.

 

14.2     South Pond Recreation Area

Directly to the South is a larger lake called South Pond.  There is a navigable canal between the two lakes, which is used by boats in the summer and by snowmobiles in the winter to go between the two lakes.  South Pond is almost all-natural shoreline, with only a few structures built on it.  In some parts of the lake, it has a depth of 160 feet!  Also this is the second clearest lake in New Hampshire with water clarity to 30 feet.  Using a canoe or a kayak, you can work your way along the shoreline and see huge logs and boulders along the bottom of the lake. 

 

On the western shore, there is a National Forest Recreation Area with a beautiful beach, complete with bathhouses and picnic area. 

 

14.3     Hiking Trails

Off of the south end of the picnic area, there is a trail that heads south along the western shore.  This trail eventually leads to the Kilkenny Mountain Range and eventually to the Presidential Range thirty miles away.

 

However, less than a mile away there is a side trail into a narrow chasm with high rock cliffs on either side called “Devils Hopyard”.  As you progress further into the chasm, the climbing becomes more difficult due to the large boulders strewn about.  However with some perseverance, you can reach the end and return for an interesting two-hour hike.

 

14.4     Hidden Treasures

On the southern end of the lake, there is large sandbar at the mouth of a brook. This makes a great landing place on a hot day since there are several shade trees here as well as shallow water with a sandy bottom.  If you follow the brook upstream, you will get to see the remains of a large beaver dam up close!

 

Travel a little further East from the sandbar and you will notice a small strip of land separating you from another lake.  If you land on this strip and then hike due East, you will climb a steep hill and end up at the top of a knoll overlooking two lakes.  This area is covered with a thick bed of pine needles and has been used as an overnight camping area by the locals for many years. 

 

Rounded Rectangle: 1 – Location of “Dead End” sign. Take left fork “Kelly Road”.

2- Location of Two Lakes Lodge.

3 – Location of Recreation area and beach.

4 – Location of Cohos Trail, which leads to “Kilkenny Range” and “Devils Hopyard”.

5 – Location of Recreation Area access road.  Makes a good hiking or biking trail as well.

 

 

 

 


14.5     Rocky Ponds

The smaller lakes to the south are called the Rocky Ponds.  You can portage over the strip of land and explore the Rocky Pond area, although this can be difficult in times of low water.  Eventually these ponds lead to Rocky Pond Brook (not navigable), which empties into the Ammonoosuc River.

 

14.6     Rocky Pond Trail

Returning to the Lodge and standing at the front door, look to the right and you will see that Kelly Road continues up a small incline and then turns sharply to the right.  On the left side of this sharp turn, you will see a trail leading into the brush.  If you follow this trail, it will eventually take you to a snowmobile trail and from there to a large wooden bridge over Rocky Pond Brook (about 2 miles). 

 

After you cross the wooden bridge you can take a left, which will bring you to a gravel pit and eventually to Spruceville Road (3 miles). 

 

If you take a right after the footbridge, then it will follow a logging road, bringing you to a “T” junction.  Bear right at the junction and eventually you will end up on a long straight trail that parallels the Ammonoosuc River. 

 

This trail ends at York Pond Road, right where York Pond Road crosses over the Ammonoosuc River (7 miles).  While a fairly long hike, this trail does not have any steep climbs and can be done easily in one afternoon if you leave a car at the bridge area of York Pond Road.

 

 

14.7     Fishing at South Pond

The lake in front of the Lodge (North Pond) and the lake just to the south of the Lodge that is connected by a canal (South Pond) are both stocked with fish each year.  The fish vary in size from 6” long down to 3” long and consist of many different varieties.

 

You can catch brook trout, rainbow trout, lake trout, small mouth bass, large mouth bass, chain pickerel and hornpout.  Some of these fish like to stay in South Pond which is larger, deeper and has colder water.  Others like to migrate to the shallower waters of North Pond. 

 

The water is so clear, you can normally see down 20’ so using the canoes or kayaks, you can quietly move around the lakes and look for fish along the bottom.

 

It is also common to see fish right off the dock at the Lodge or along our beach area.    We have seen red-tailed hawks and osprey dive for fish in front of the Lodge on several occasions.  It can be startling to hear this loud splash and then look up to see a bird taking off with a fish in its talons.

 

A fishing license is required for people 16 years of age and over. Licenses for non-residents are available for 1-day, 3-days, 7-days or for a season.  NH residents can purchase a 1-day license or seasonal license.  These licenses are available online at the NH Fish and Game website at http://www.wildlife.state.nh.us/ or from Gord’s Corner Store located 5 miles away from the Lodge.  Bait is also available at Gord’s Corner Store.

15     Christine Lake and Phillips Brook Falls (apx. 3 miles)

 

A short 10-minute drive away lies Christine Lake, the clearest lake in New Hampshire.  The lake and its surrounding land is privately owned, but the State of New Hampshire has a parking area and boat ramp that provides public access to the Lake itself.

 

To reach the lake, follow Kelly Road and South Pond Road back out to Rt. 110.  Take a left onto Rt. 110 (West) and then take your first right onto Bell Hill Road.  Cross over the railroad tracks and take a left onto Percy Road.  Follow this road for just over a mile and you will come to an intersection.  Take a right onto Christine Lake Road and it immediately climbs steeply up hill. 

 

Shortly you will see a waterfall on your left then the road levels out and comes to a “Y” intersection.  Bear left and you will arrive at the Christine Lake parking area and boat ramp.  You can explore the lake by boat and use the immediate beach area, but the remaining lands do not allow access without permission of the landowner.  If you look hard in the distance, you will see a group of 7 houses at the far end of the lake.  These are privately owned houses (the only ones on the lake), which are used by the landowners, mainly in the summer.

 

15.1     Phillips Brook Falls

 

From the Lodge, follow Kelly Road and South Pond Road out to Rt. 110.  Take a right onto Rt. 110 (Eest) and then look for Paris Road on your left about a mile away.  Follow Paris Road across the RR tracks up a hill to a 4-way intersection.  At the intersection take a left and then look for the Phillips Brook Falls on your right.  There is a small parking area so you can park and explore the area.  Years ago, this area had a water driven mill and there was a small community here called Crystal Village.  Now only a few houses remain, but the falls are still spectacular.


 

16     Nash Stream State Forest (apx. 4 miles)

 

This is the largest forest area owned by the State of New Hampshire. The gateway to the forest is the two large hills called Percy Peaks (apx. 3200 feet in elevation), which are clearly visible from Rt. 110.  The forest is open to the public a no charge and contains a great variety of outdoor recreation opportunities. 

 

16.1     Winter Activities

In the winter, the entire forest area is crisscrossed with snowmobile trails.  From the forest, there are trails that run north, south, east and west.  This trail system to the North is maintained by the Groveton Trailblazers and they have a map of these snowmobile trails on their web site at (www.grovetontrailblazers.com).  In 2004, a new connector trail was completed that provides access to trails to the south through the towns of Gorham and Jefferson via the White Mountain Ridge Runner Trail system (www.whitemtsridgerunners.com).  To reach this trail from the Lodge, follow Kelly Road south, past the Lodge about 200 feet.  As Kelly Road turns right, there is a trail that heads into the woods on the left.  Follow this trail ¼ mile to the main snowmobile trail.

 

16.2     Summer Activities

In the summer, the Nash Stream Forest is used primarily for hiking, biking and fishing.  Similar to the South Pond area, there are camps that were established before it became a State Forest that are allowed to existing within the forest boundaries.

 

In the summer only, the State of New Hampshire allows you to drive into the forest in registered vehicles.  To reach the entrance to the forest, take Rt. 110 West 2 miles to the center of Stark Village.  Cross over the covered bridge and take a left onto Northside Road.  Follow this road about 3 miles to a “Y” intersection and take the right fork onto Nash Stream Road (gravel).  You will pass through a parking area and eventually you will see a gated bridge on you left that crosses the Nash Stream River.  From this point on, the river will be on your left for several miles.  Listed below is a detailed description of scenic places accessible from Nash Stream Road.

 

16.3     Percy Peaks Trail

A short way past the bridge, watch for a sign that marks the start of the Percy Peaks trail.  This is a steep trail and can be difficult to climb in bad weather.  Another more gradually loop trail allows you to climb the back of the peaks.  Refer to the Cohos Trail web site for more information on this trail (www.cohostrail.org).

 

16.4     Pond Brook Falls

Seven miles in on Nash Stream Road you will cross over a bridge at Pond Brook.  Look for a small parking area on the right.  From there a trail goes east a few hundred feet to Pond Brook Falls.  This is a large natural granite slab that has been worn smooth by the water over the years.  It is a great place to bring a picnic lunch any time of the year.  Depending on the season, you can climb on the rocks along the river, but watch out - these rocks can be slippery!

There is a bridge over the Nash Stream River just a few hundred feet away.  Continue north on Nash Stream Road on foot from the Pond Brook parking area and take the next trail on your left.  This will lead you to a snowmobile bridge over the Nash Stream River, which has a great view year around.

16.5     Sugarloaf Trail

Continue North on Nash Stream Road another two miles and you will cross over another bridge, which crosses over the Nash Stream River.  Just past this bridge, you will see a trail on your left and a small camp.  Just past the camp is a “Y” junction.  Bear right and the trail climbs up a steep hill.  At the top of the hill there is another “Y” junction, with the larger trail heading left and a small trail heading straight upward.  Follow the straight upward trail and it will take you to the top of Sugarloaf Mountain.  At 3,700 feet, this mountain has a spectacular view to the West, South and East from a rocky knoll that has a shear drop-off of several hundred feet.

 

16.6     Nash Stream Bog

Continuing north on Nash Stream Road you will begin to see several camps on your right side.  These camps surround a dry lakebed called Nash Stream Bog.  The bog was built to store water to float logs down Nash Stream.  In the late 1960’s, the earthen dam holding back the water broke during heavy rains and flooded downtown Groveton with several feet of water.  After the flood, it was decided to not rebuild the dam and so now the camps surround a dry lakebed.

Most of these camps are used in the winter when the owners bring all of their supplies in by snowmobile.  After passing the camps, there are some remote hiking and snowmobile trails, but no more short hike destinations.

 


17     Jericho Mountain State Park (apx. 12 miles)

 

This is a 7,200 acre state park established in 2005 to promote motorized recreation.  The park includes over 50 miles of trails that can be used by ATV’s and dirt bikes in the summer and fall and by snowmobiles in the winter.  You can bring your own vehicles or you can rent from Jericho Motorsports located right across the street from the park.  If you have never been out on ATV’s or snowmobiles, it is really a lot of fun and a very family oriented activity.  The park has something for everyone including easy-to-ride gravel roads to technically difficult trails with rock and water obstacles.  There are many outstanding views from almost every trail in the park.

 

In the summer/fall season, the park is open during daylight hours from late May to early December.  In the winter, the park is open to snowmobiling day or night from December 15th until the snow melts in late March or early April.  The park is closed for mud season from mid-April to late-May.

 

All ATV’s, dirt bikes and snowmobiles must be registered in the State of NH before you can ride on any trails.  All wheeled vehicle trails are marked with green diamonds showing pictures of an ATV or dirt bike.  If you do not see these green diamonds, then it is not a legal wheeled vehicle trail.   Snowmobile trails are marked with red diamonds and corridor and primary trail route numbers.  If you do not see these types of markings, then it is not a legal snowmobile trail.

 

Jericho Mountain State Park

Location/Phone:  Rt. 110, Berlin, NH – 603-271-3245 (NH Bureau of Trails)

Web Site:  http://www.nhtrails.org/trail-uses/atvs/jericho.aspx

Hours:  May 23 to December 15th - day use only, December 15th to April 1st  day or night use.

Closed during mud season.

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 10 miles to Berlin and look for Jericho Mountain Park entrance on your right. 

 

Historical Notes: The park was purchased with funds collected from the registration of ATV’s.  A lot of the park was clear-cut as part of the original purchase agreement with the former owner.  Trees are being re-grown and in the meantime, there are spectacular views from almost every trail in the park.

 

Jericho Motorsports (ATV and Snowmobile Rentals)

Location/Phone: Rt. 110, Berlin, NH - 603-788-4004

Hours:  Mon-Sat 9:00am - 5:00pm, Sun: By appointment only.

Web Site: http://www.jerichomotorsports.com/

Amenities:  Visitors Center (opening summer 2011), Warming Hut (Opening Fall of 2011), public outhouses and outdoor pavilions on trails, lake with picnic area.

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 10 miles to Berlin and look for Jericho Mountain Park entrance on your right.  Stay on Rt. 110 for another ½ mile to reach Jericho Motorsports on your left.


 

18     Weeks State Park (apx. 20 miles)

 

This is a state park on top of Mt. Prospect with stunning views, an old mansion, a working fire tower and a museum dedicated to John Weeks, who is considered the “father” of the White Mountain National Forest.

 

Location/Phone: Rt. 3, Lancaster, NH - 603-788-4004

Hours: Mid-June to September, 10am to 6pm (closed Monday & Tuesday)

Web Site: http://www.nhstateparks.org/state-parks/alphabetical-order/john-wingate-weeks-historic-site/

Amenities: Sightseeing, Museum, Hiking, and Picnicking

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South to Lancaster (apx 10 miles) and then toward Whitefield (apx 2 miles).  At the top of a large hill, just South of Lancaster, look for the entrance of Weeks State Park on your left.

Note: This access road is very steep and narrow, suitable for autos and pedestrians only.  Large camper vehicles or vehicles with trailers cannot negotiate this road.

 

Historical Notes: You may not know John Wingate Weeks, but you certainly have benefited from his labors.  If you have ever visited a National Park or National Forest, then you owe John Weeks a “thank you”.  He was a member of congress who envisioned and eventually established a funding mechanism for our National Forest and Park system.  His initial efforts established the White Mountain National Forest, which was eventually used as blueprint for establishing other National Forests across the country.

John Weeks was a native of Lancaster, NH and Weeks State Park encompasses his 450-acre estate at the top of Mt. Prospect, which was his home for many years.  The park was established when his lands and his mountain top mansion were given to the state of New Hampshire by his son, Sinclair Weeks, former Secretary of Commerce under President Eisenhower, and his daughter, Katherine Weeks Davidge.

The mansion has a 360-degree view of many surrounding mountaintops in New Hampshire and Vermont.  It was used for entertaining many dignitaries including Teddy Roosevelt.  Today the mansion houses a detailed history of the White Mountain Forest including many pictures from the 1900’s showing that the entire northern forest areas were clear-cut!  There is also an extensive collection of stuffed birds and animals from several private collections.

In addition to the mansion, the Forest Service maintains a fire lookout above and a radio rebroadcast facility for State Police, Forest Service, and other special state public works agencies.


19     Covered Bridge Mini-Tour

One of the uniquely New England features is the covered bridge. The State of New Hampshire has over 50 covered bridges still standing and you are within a two-hour drive of 8 of those bridges.  Coming into the Lodge, you passed by two of the bridges, one in Groveton Center and the other in Stark Center.  In the town of Lancaster, 10 miles south of Groveton there are two more covered bridges.  In the town of Columbia, 27 miles north of Groveton, there is a covered bridge across the Connecticut River between New Hampshire and Vermont.  In the town of Pittsburg, 40 miles north of Groveton, there are 3 more covered bridges. 

As a point of interest, you may be interested to know that bridges that cross the Connecticut River are only listed in New Hampshire. This is due to the fact that the New Hampshire border with Vermont is at the low water on the western bank of the Connecticut River. Therefore even though the Connecticut River is considered to be the border with Vermont, the Connecticut River actually flows through New Hampshire.  (This was based on a 1934 United States Supreme Court decision.)  Therefore since the river is in New Hampshire, the bridges are also considered to be in NH as well.

19.1     History of Covered Bridges

The old rumor about covered bridges is that they were built for discretely kissing your favorite girl on the buggy ride home from church.  Of course the reasons are far more practical.

When winter came in the 1800’s, main modes of transportation (wheeled buggies and wagons) were stored for the winter and replaced with sleighs.  The road agents of the day used large barrel-like devices drawn by horses to roll the snow flat and hard. Of course, this caused a problem for the bridges because they were built of wooden timbers and could not support the weight of a long winter's snow. 

Covered bridges were actually invented in Europe to solve the same snow problem and some enterprising colonists adapted the European designs for bridges in Connecticut. These early colonists named and patented their truss designs, so that is why you see truss names associated with covered bridges.

Once the viability of large wooden bridges was proven, towns, toll-bridge companies and railroads began building them. By the early 1800's, several contractors were competing for a piece of the bridge building market all around New England.

We are fortunate to have several covered bridges close by to the Lodge. Shown below is a list of those bridges along with directions.  If you can’t find a bridge, just ask a local resident.  Everyone in town knows where the covered bridges are located.


 

19.2     List of Bridges (in near to far order)

 

19.2.1    Stark Bridge – Stark, NH (apx. 3 miles)

(1862) Two-span, 134'-1" in length over the Upper Ammonoosuc River using Paddleford truss construction.

Location: Rt. 110 in the center of Stark Village, 8 miles east of Groveton.

 

Historical Notes: The Bridge was originally a simple Paddleford truss with a center Pier. During the 1890's, high water removed the center pier and the bridge was washed downstream. It was brought back by men and oxen and set on new stone piers. Arches were added to strengthen the span and the center pier was removed. The bridge failed again in the 1940's and in 1954 it was rehabilitated by removing the arch, adding some steel girders and building a center pier.

 

During the 1950's, the people of Stark voted to replace the bridge with a new steel bridge. The outcry from artists and covered bridge enthusiasts was so great that instead, with aid of the state, the covered bridge was restored. The site is scenic and a popular location for photographers, being the second most photographed place in New Hampshire behind Old Man in the Mountain.

 

The Stark Bridge was featured on the town of Stark's Bicentennial Medal in 1974. A new roof was built in the summer/fall of 1982 at a cost of $18,750. The state repaired the underside of the bridge in 1983 at a cost of $35,500. The Stark Bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

 

 

19.2.2    Groveton Bridge – Groveton, NH (apx. 8 miles)

(1852), 126 ft. in length over the Upper Ammonoosuc River. 

Location: Located at the intersection of Rt. 3 and Rt. 110 in Groveton, NH.

 

Historical Notes:  Paddleford truss, added arch. Built by Capt. Richardson & Son. Now used for foot and snowmobile traffic only.  When U.S. Route 3 was reconstructed in 1939, the Groveton Covered Bridge was bypassed. Milton Graton and his son Arnold repaired it in 1964-1965. A water supply line is suspended beneath the bridge.

 


 

19.2.3    Mt. Orne Bridge – Lancaster, NH (apx. 18 miles)

(1911) Two-span, 266'-3" in length over the Connecticut River.  Howe truss.

Location: West of Rt.135, 5 miles west of Lancaster Village between Lancaster, NH and Lunenburg, VT.


Historical Notes: The first bridge at this site was constructed in the 1860's or 70's to connect the towns of Lancaster and Lunenburg. The owner, Union Bridge Company, operated it as a toll bridge until a log jam destroyed it in 1908.

 

Ferry service connected the two communities until a new bridge was built in 1911. Each town contributed $2,500. The remaining $1,678 was raised by subscription. The timber for the bridge was precut and assembled at the site.

 

In 1969, a truck loaded with highway salt dropped through the deck and landed on the ice below. The front of the truck hooked on a steel rod in the bridge while the rear rested on the ice below. The truck was raised, disengaged from the bridge, and lowered to the ice. It was quickly dragged from the salt weakened area, turned upright and loaded on to a flatbed on the Vermont side of the river.

 

The bridge was closed on July 5, 1983 for twelve weeks to allow rehabilitation by the state of New Hampshire at a cost of $133,000. Funding came from the towns of Lancaster and Lunenburg, the states of New Hampshire and Vermont, and a federal Historic Preservation Fund matching grant from the National Park Service.  The rededication of the bridge took place on November 23, 1983. The Mt. Orne Bridge is listed on the National Register of Historical Places.


 

19.2.4    Mechanic Street BridgeLancaster, NH (apx. 18 miles)

(1862), 94'-3" in length over the Israel River. Paddleford truss.

Location: East of the intersection of Rt. 2 and Rt. 3 in Lancaster Village.

Historical Notes: At a meeting on July 10, 1862, shortly after the construction of the bridge, the citizens of Lancaster voted to instruct the selectmen to put a signboard at each end of the bridge that prohibited driving across the bridge at a pace faster than a walk.

 

In 1962, Lancaster requested the state to provide an estimate for rehabilitation of the Mechanic Street covered bridge. The total cost was estimated to be $18,000 of which $10,800 was to be the responsibility of the town with the remainder to be furnished by the state. The town took no action this estimate at their annual town meeting, however, the abutments were repaired in 1967 by the state. This bridge is also known as the Israel River Bridge.


 

19.2.5    Columbia Bridge - Columbia, NH (apx. 28 miles)

(1912), 145'-9" in length over the Connecticut River.  Howe truss, built by Charles Babbitt.

Location: West of Rt.153 in Columbia Village. Bridge runs from Columbia, NH to Lemington, VT

 

Historical Notes: The Columbia Bridge was built in 1912 to replace an earlier bridge, which had been destroyed by fire the previous year. It was rehabilitated by the state in 1981 at a cost of $143,000. It is the most northerly Connecticut River Bridge connecting Vermont and New Hampshire. The Columbia Bridge is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.



19.2.6    Pittsburg-Clarksville Bridge – Pittsburg, NH (apx. 46 miles)

(1876), 88'-6" in length over the Connecticut River. Paddleford truss with added arch.

Location: south of Rt. 3, 1 mile west of Pittsburg Village.

 

Historical Notes: Of the remaining covered bridges in New Hampshire, the Pittsburg-Clarksville Bridge is located the furthest north over the Connecticut River. The actual date of construction is unknown, but there is a reference in town records that states, " In 1876, money was raised to build a bridge at Fletcher 's Mill." It is assumed, by town officials, that this is the date of the present bridge. (Ebenezer Fletcher owned a sawmill that was built in 1825 near this bridge.)

 

In 1878, the Town of Clarksville was approached by Pittsburg officials to see what the town would do about paying Pittsburg for building two-thirds of the bridge near the Fletcher Mill. The Town of Clarksville voted not to pay the Town of Pittsburg anything.

 

This structure is one of seven covered bridges built in Pittsburg and one of three that remain standing. The bridge is also known as the Bacon Road Bridge. It was rehabilitated in 1974 at a cost of $6,700. The residents of Clarksville were more accommodating in this century and agreed to share the costs of rehabilitation with Pittsburg and the state. It was closed to traffic in 1981.

 

19.2.7    Happy Corner BridgePittsburg, NH (apx. 46 miles)

(mid-1800’s),  60'-6" in length over Perry Stream. Paddleford truss with added arch.

Location: One mile south of Rt. 3 and 6 miles northeast of Pittsburg Village.

 

Historical Notes:  Happy Corner was a bustling neighborhood in the late 1800's. At the Perry Stream crossing there was a sawmill, a starch mill, a store with a post office, a barbershop, and the Temperance Hall. Nearby was the Danforth School. It has been stated by the Pittsburg Historical Society that before the building of the bridge, people used to ford the stream just upstream, where the water was shallow.

 

The following story is one of several that tell how the bridge got its name. There was an elderly gentleman who lived in a house, which is still standing on the northeast corner of the crossroads. This gentleman liked to sing and dance he owned a Victrola which he played frequently. People congregated at his house and generally had a "happy" time singing and dancing. That's why the crossroads was called Happy Corner.

Happy Corner Bridge is one of the oldest covered bridges in northern New Hampshire. In the mid 1960's it was repaired by the state at a cost of $12,000. The town of Pittsburg and the state shared the cost of the repairs.

 

 

19.2.8    River Road BridgePittsburg, NH (apx. 46 miles)

(1858), 50'-6" in length over Perry Stream.  Queenpost truss.

Location: South of Rt. 3 and Rt. 51, 2 miles northeast of Pittsburg Village.

 

Historical Notes: Little is known about this bridge and nothing has been recorded in the town records. The bridge has now been bypassed. The bridge is closed to all but pedestrian traffic. Periodically, volunteers have undertaken the cleaning of the bridge and minor repairs.




20     Grand Resort Hotel Tour

 

Two Lakes Lodge is located with easy drive of three of the four remaining Grand Resort Hotels in New Hampshire. These hotels developed a reputation as being a destination onto itself by offering an amazing array of services and luxurious accommodations. You can still re-live this golden age made famous a century ago by enjoying, lunch, dinner, a golf game or other outdoor activities at one of these Grand Resort Hotels.

 

20.1     History of The Grand Resort Hotels

In the late 19th century, there was a greater concentration of grand resort hotels in New Hampshire's White Mountains than anywhere else in America. Depending on the source, between 19 and 30 of these hotels were operating in the White Mountains at the turn of the century.  Including other hotels, inns and boarding houses, more than 12,000 people could be accommodated during the height of the era, between 1885 and 1910. The development of these hotels was directly connected to the development of the railroads in the 1850’s, eliminating the long and uncomfortable stagecoach ride north.

 

With the increased accessibility that the railroads provided, plus expanded wealth made available because of the industrial revolution, a newly emerging middle class contributed to a dramatic rise in tourism to the region. From 1851 on, a trade that had been measured in hundreds of people would now be measured in tens of thousands.

 

Grand resort hotels each had its own train station or livery service and its own versions of comfort and elegance: gas lighting, fancy dining, lawn tennis, coaching parades, and mountain guides. Each of these establishments had a guest capacity of 200 or more, each was built entirely of wood, and many were destroyed by fire. The last of the truly grand hotels to be built was the Mount Washington in Bretton Woods. One of the largest, and one of the few still operating today, it opened in 1902 in an era when corporate executives commonly sent their families to the White Mountains for the summer months and visited them on weekends.

 

The hotel industry flourished in the White Mountains because of the district's proximity to major East Coast cities. Europeans were also drawn to the White Mountains by descriptions of “superior mountain scenery” and “huge hotels” populated almost as thickly as they lie in Switzerland.

 

20.2     The Grand Resort Hotels of Today (in near to far order)

In New Hampshire, there are only 4 remaining Grand Resort Hotels.  These are: Mountain View Grand in Whitefield, Mount Washington Hotel in Bretton Woods, The Balsams Hotel in Dixville Notch, and Wentworth-by-the-Sea in New Castle (near Portsmouth on the Seacoast).  Three of these Grand Hotels are each within an hours driving distance of Two Lakes Lodge.  Below is a list of these hotels and a bit of their history for your enjoyment.  We encourage to you call ahead because some of these hotels operate seasonally.


 

20.2.1    Mountain View Grand - Whitefield, NH (apx 23 miles)

Location/Phone: Off Rt. 3, between Lancaster and Whitefield - 800-438-3017

Web Site: www.mountainviewgrand.com

Amenities: Sightseeing, Golf, Dining, Full Service Spa

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South to Lancaster (apx 10 miles) and then toward Whitefield (apx 5 miles).  Between Lancaster and Whitefield, you will climb a large hill (Mt. Prospect/Weeks State Park) and then pass by a small car dealer on your left.  Just past the car dealer look for a large sign on your left that marks the entrance road to the Mountain View Hotel.  If you see signs for the Weathervane Theatre or the Whitefield Inn or you reach the town center of Whitefield, then you have gone too far.

 

Historical Notes: The Mountain View traces its beginnings to 1865, when a stagecoach en route from Boston to Montreal hit a large mud hole and overturned on a back road in the small township of Whitefield. Two passengers climbed out and were told by the driver to follow the dirt road a half-mile until they reached a farmhouse. Despite the late hour, the travelers were welcomed at the home of William Dodge, thus beginning a long tradition of Mountain View hospitality.

 

The travelers awoke early the next morning to the smell of a home-cooked breakfast. After breakfast they wandered out on to the porch where they were quickly captivated by the breath-taking views of the Presidential Mountain Range, a glorious series of 4,000 foot peaks in the White Mountains.

 

Impressed by the hospitality of the Dodges and the beautiful, inviting natural surroundings, the guests returned the following summer for a sojourn of several weeks, inspiring the Dodges to add the first of many additions to come and to begin a small boarding house that they called the Mountain View House.

 

The architectural growth of the Mountain View House began in 1866 when the Dodges opened a modest country inn. Over the years, several additions were made. By the summer of 1884, the Mountain View House could accommodate over 100 guests. During the months between 1911 and 1912, construction continued and the Mountain View House soon joined the prestigious ranks of those elite White Mountain Hotels with space for over 200 guests.  All this time, the Dodge Family continued to run the hotel.

 

Finally, in 1979, faced with a changing tourist market, automobile fuel shortages and financial instability, the descendants of William Dodge sold the Mountain View House, thus ending the Dodges claim as the oldest resort to be owned and operated continuously by the same family living on the same property. 

 

The last functioning years of the Mountain View House were fraught with stress and uncertainty. In 1986, after several summers producing marginal financial returns, the hotel closed its doors. In 1989 all of the contents of the hotel were put up for auction.

 

The Mountain View House was purchased in 1998 by a young entrepreneur, Kevin Craffey who diligently re-created the splendor of the golden days of the grand resort hotels in the White Mountains. The new Mountain View Grand will opened its doors in May 2002 after a massive $20 million dollar restoration.  We were there for the grand re-opening and this hotel is worth a visit on your way into or out of the Lodge.  In addition to a golf course, they have a world-class spa and several restaurants.

 

New England resorts,New Hampshire resorts,grand hotels,Mountain View Grand Hotel,Historic,New England Inns,conference centers,wedding facilities,meeting rooms,mountain views,skiing,snowboarding,hiking,fall foliage tours,XC skiing,Whitefield NH, Littleton NH

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The Mountain View Grand looks out over the golf course

to a skyline filled with Mountain Peaks.”


 

20.2.2    Mountain Washington Hotel - Bretton Woods, NH (apx 39 miles)

Location/Phone:  Rt. 302, 5 miles west of Twin Mountain – 603-278-1000

Web Site: www.mtwashington.com

Amenities: Sightseeing, Skiing, Cog Railway, Golf, Hiking, Biking, Horseback Riding, Dining

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South to Lancaster (apx 10 miles) and then through Whitefield to the stoplight Twin Mountain.  At the stoplight, take a left onto Rt. 302 east and travel about 5 miles to Bretton Woods.  You will see the Mt. Washington Hotel on your left. 

 

Historical Notes:  2002 was the centennial year for this historic hotel. The hotel was built by New Hampshire native Joseph Stickney, who made his fortune in coal mining and the Pennsylvania Railroad. Stickney spared no expense in building the imposing hotel.

 

During its construction, the latest design and building methods were used. Innovative and complicated heating and plumbing systems were installed. To this day, the Bretton Woods Hotel has its own private telephone system and Post Office. Ground was broken in 1900 and construction was completed in 1902. Two hundred and fifty Italian craftsmen, skilled in masonry and woodworking, were brought to Bretton Woods and housed on the grounds. A new type of power plant served reliably for over 50 years.

 

On July 28, 1902, the front doors of this Grand Hotel opened to the public with a staff of no less than 350. The most luxurious hotel of its day, The Mount Washington catered to wealthy guests from Boston, New York and Philadelphia. As many as fifty trains a day stopped at Bretton Woods' three railroad stations. One of these stations, Fabyan's, is now one of the Resort's dining establishments.  The Hotel has been host to countless celebrities, including Winston Churchill, Thomas Edison, Babe Ruth and three U.S. Presidents.

 

In 1944, The Mount Washington hosted the Bretton Woods International Monetary Conference. Delegates from 44 nations convened, establishing the World Bank and International Monetary Fund, setting the gold standard at $35.00 an ounce and designating the United States dollar as the backbone of international exchange. The signing of the formal documents took place in the Gold Room, located off the Hotel Lobby and now preserved as an historic site.

In 1955, the Hotel was sold to Mr. and Mrs. Morris J. Fleisher of Philadelphia, who operated the Hotel for 15 seasons until its sale in 1969 to Mount Washington Development Company. This company developed the popular Bretton Woods Ski Area and reacquired many out-parcels, thus consolidating the original Stickney Estate.

Bretton Woods Corporation acquired the property in 1975. Under its ownership, The Mount Washington Hotel was listed in the National Register of Historic Places, and 6,400 acres of beautiful woodlands were sold to the United States government for inclusion in the White Mountain National Forest.

 

In 1986, the United States Department of the Interior recognized the historical and architectural significance of The Mount Washington Hotel with a National Historic Landmark designation. The 1896 Bretton Arms Inn, a Victorian inn located on the Hotel grounds, was also awarded National Historic Landmark status as part of the designation given The Mount Washington Hotel.

In 1991, a new chapter in the Hotel's history began as a group of New Hampshire businessmen joined forces to purchase it and the surrounding property. A long-term plan has been enacted to preserve this grand New England Resort and the area's unsurpassed scenic beauty. A major part of that plan is to enhance the Hotel's Victorian charm and elegance while offering modern-day comfort and convenience.

Making history once again, The Mount Washington Hotel opened for its "First Winter" season ever, beginning Thanksgiving Day, 1999.

 

 

 

“Regal yet casual, the Mt. Washington Hotel welcomes everyone

to the base of the mountain that shares its name.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20.2.3    The Cog Railway - Bretton Woods, NH (apx 39 miles)

Location/Phone: Off Rt. 302, 6 miles west of Twin Mountain – 603-278-5404

Hours: April through November – Call ahead for departure times.

Note: While you are visiting the Mount Washington Hotel, you may want to take a side trip to the top of Mt. Washington via the Cog Railroad, a coal fired train.  At the top you will find a visitors center with a food court and lots of history about the mountain including its incredible weather extremes.  Regardless of the temperature on the ground, dress for cold weather and wind if you decide to take this trip!

 

Web Sites: www.thecog.com      www.mountwashington.com

Directions: Leaving the Mt. Washington Hotel, take a right onto Rt. 302 west to Fabyan’s Restaurant, take a right onto the Base Road and continue 6 miles to the Cog Base Station.

 

Historical Notes: His dream began in 1852 when, after becoming lost near the summit of Mount Washington, Sylvester Marsh knew that there had to be a better way for people to reach the highest mountain peak in the Northeast.

 

Upon his return home, he immediately started working on a plan to build the world's first mountain-climbing cog railway. Marsh, a native of Campton, New Hampshire, had made his fortune in Chicago's meatpacking industry and was considered by his contemporaries to be a creative and innovative thinker. However, upon first presenting his idea to members of the New Hampshire Legislature, they laughed at Sylvester Marsh and said that he "might as well build a railway to the Moon."

 

Undaunted, Marsh began the task of building his mountain climbing railway, along with inventors Herrick and Walter Aiken, a father-and-son team from Franklin, New Hampshire. The task was not an easy one, since equipment and materials had to be hauled by oxen for 25 miles to Bretton Woods, and then another six miles through thick forest to the base of Mount Washington. But on July 3, 1869, 'Old Peppersass' became the first cog-driven train to climb 6,288-foot Mount Washington.

 

Jacob's Ladder

 


 

20.2.4    The Balsams Hotel - Dixville Notch, NH (apx. 40 miles)

Location/Phone: Rt. 26 between Colebrook and Errol – 603-255-3400

Web Site: www.thebalsams.com

Hours: Operates in the Summer and Winter – call ahead for hours of operation.

Amenities: Sightseeing, Skiing, Golf, Hiking, Biking, Dining

Directions: Take Rt. 110 east 4 miles to West Milan.  Just before the West Milan Grocery, take a left onto Rt. 110A (towards Cedar Pond).  Follow Rt. 110A to about 4 miles to Rt. 16.  Take a left onto Rt. 16 north and travel about 17 miles to Errol center (great river views along this road).  In Errol center, take a left onto Rt. 26 and travel 11 miles through Millsfield to Dixville Notch.  After passing through the Notch, you will see the Balsams Hotel on your right.

 

Historical Notes:  The Balsams has operated continuously since first opening as the Dix House in 1866.  The Inn was named after the town's founding father and first landowner, Colonel Timothy Dix. A patriot of the American Revolution, Dix was given a 10,000-acre land grant for his participation in the war.  Unfortunately, Dix lost his life in battle during the war of 1812 before he could develop his parcel. His attorney and business partner, Daniel Webster, took over Dix's land holdings in 1813.

 

Soon after, Webster sponsored the town's first settlers, the Whittemore family. The Whttemore’s built a farmhouse in the Notch and weary travelers were refreshed by the Whittemore's home-style hospitality. This generous family-style accommodation of overnight guests evolved into more sophisticated destination resort hospitality, soon popular everywhere and known appropriately as "the American plan”, where meals, lodging, etc. is included for one price.

 

However it was the arrival of the Railroad in nearby Colebrook in 1850 that brought people a mere “1-day” stagecoach ride away.  A man named George Parsons recognized the potential for the area and built Dix House, a gabled farmhouse that could accommodate 50 guests as early as 1866.

 

In 1895, a wealthy Philadelphia inventor and industrialist, Henry S. Hale, purchased the Dix House (where he had been a long-time summer guest) and renamed it The Balsams.. Hale's creative spirit was prolific, and he steadily expanded and enhanced the resort's facilities and accommodations. By 1918 Hale realized his final vision for The Balsams with the completion of the Hampshire House, still called the "new wing." This elegant addition effectively doubled the overnight capacity of the resort to 400 guests. To this day, full-house guest numbers remain unchanged. There are no condominiums or second home developments on the Balsms property.

 

Downturns affected the hotel after World War I. In 1922, J.J. Lannin, part owner of the Boston Red Sox, purchased The Balsams. Rumor has it that the deal to sell Babe Ruth to the New York Yankees came to fruition here. A series of other owners followed. When bankruptcy was declared in 1954, Neil Tillotson, who made his fortune with the manufacture of latex products, bought the property.  (There is a factory on the grounds that still produces latex gloves for U.S and overseas markets).

 

In the 1960 election, the voters of Dixville Notch were "First in the Nation" to report the results of the Presidential election. (That year the results were Nixon 9, Kennedy 0.) Since then, Dixville Notch voters have agreed to turn out every four years to The Ballot Room in the Hotel, just before midnight on Election Day to maintain the tradition.

 

The National Trust has recognized the Balsams for Historic Preservation as one of America's treasured historic hotels. Since 1866, the resort has had only six owners. The current hosts have been in place since 1971. As former seasonal employees, they practice a distinctive style of hands-on management.

 

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The Balsams, New Hampshire, ski lessons, snowboard instruction, the perfect ski and snowboard vacation for families

 

“Set on 15,000 pristine acres, the Balsams Hotel is in a world of its own.”


21     Theme Parks and Attractions  (in near to far order)

 

Two Lakes Lodge is located near several theme parks and family oriented attractions.  Most of these attractions are grouped into four areas, so it is possible to visit more than one attraction in a day.  All of these attractions are within a 30 – 75 minute drive from the Lodge and you get the added benefit of seeing some great mountain views along the way. 

 

Listed below is an overview for each of the parks and attractions along with directions and phone numbers.  Since all of these attractions operate seasonally, we strongly encourage you to call ahead to find out their hours of operation.

 

At the end of this section is a map showing the location of these attractions, to assist you with the planning of your day trips.

 

21.1     Riverside Speedway - Groveton, NH (apx. 10 miles)

A family oriented racing center with a ¼ mile, high-banked oval track.  The speedway runs several different types of races each week and there are usually lots of bumps, crashes and spinouts for added excitement during each race.  Since all of the seating is open-air grandstand style, dress for cool nights, bring mosquito repellent and a seat pad.

Hours:  Operates May thru October, always on Saturday nights and some Sundays - call ahead.

Location/Phone: Rt. 3 Just North of Groveton center on Brown Road - 603-636-2005 

Web Site:  www.riversidespeedway.com

Amenities: Car racing, food concessions.

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 North through Groveton Center and look for Brown Road on your left.  Follow the signs to Riverside Speedway.

 

21.2     Six Gun City and Fort Splash - Jefferson, NH (apx. 23 miles)

A family entertainment center with over 35 buildings, 11 rides, a large museum and a petting zoo all with a Wild West theme.

Hours:  Operates May thru September – call ahead.

Location/Phone: Rt. 2 between Lancaster center and Jefferson center - 603-586-4592 

Web Site: www.sixguncity.com

Amenities: Sightseeing, swimming, carriage and sleigh museum, water park, miniature golf, stagecoach ride, miniature horses, theme shows, dining.

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South about 10 miles to Lancaster Center.  Take Rt. 2 East (bear left after leaving center) past the Cabot Motor Inn and look for Santa’s Village on your right about 5 miles out of Lancaster Center.


 

21.3     Santa’s Village - Jefferson, NH (apx. 23 miles)

A family entertainment center with amusement park rides, live and animated shows and live reindeer all with a Christmas theme.

Hours:  Operates May thru October – call ahead.

Location/Phone: Rt. 2 between Lancaster center and Jefferson center - 603-586-4445 

Web Site: www.santasvillage.com

Amenities: Sightseeing, train ride, bumper cars, Ferris wheel, carousel, car driving, shows, dining.

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South about 10 miles to Lancaster Center.  Take Rt. 2 East (bear left after leaving center) past the Cabot Motor Inn and look for Santa’s Village on your right about 5 miles out of Lancaster Center.

 

21.4     Mount Washington Auto Road – Gorham, NH (apx. 28 miles)

Opened in 1861, the Mount Washington Auto Road is America's oldest manmade tourist attraction.  You can drive your car to the visitor center at the top of the mountain.

Hours: Operates May thru October – call ahead.

Location/Phone: Rt. 16, just south of Gorham center - 603-466-3988 

Web Site: www.mt-washington.com/autoroad/index.html

Amenities: Sightseeing, highest peak on East Coast, gift shop, dining.

Directions: Take Rt. 110 east about 14 miles to Berlin.  You will pass by the Berlin Police Station and go under a small railroad bridge and come to a light.  At that light, take a right, which will bring you to Rt. 16 South.  Follow Rt. 16 South about 6 miles into Gorham and then another 8 miles to the entrance of the Auto Road.

Note: When returning to Stark, be sure to follow the Rt. 110 signs carefully since it is easy to get lost in the center of Berlin.

 

21.5     The Cog Railway - Bretton Woods, NH (apx. 41 miles)

A train that uses a cog gear to climb a steep track to the visitor center at the top of Mt. Washington. 

Hours: Operates April through November – call ahead.

Location/Phone: Off Rt. 302, 8 miles east of Twin Mountain – 603-278-5404 

Web Sites: www.thecog.com      www.mountwashington.com

Amenities: Sightseeing, highest peak on East Coast, vintage train ride, gift shop, dining.

Note: Regardless of the temperature on the ground, dress for cold weather and wind if you decide to take this trip!

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South to Lancaster (apx 10 miles) and then through Whitefield to the stoplight Twin Mountain (apx 15 miles).  At the stoplight, take a left onto Rt. 302 east and travel about 2 miles to Fabyan’s Restaurant.  Take a left and follow the base road 6 miles to the Cog Base Station. 


 

21.6     Cannon Mountain - Franconia Notch, NH (apx. 43 miles)

A ski area in the winter and a resort destination in the summer offering a number of outdoor activities.

Hours: Operates winter and summer – call ahead.

Location/Phone: Rt. 3/Rt. 93, 10 miles south of Twin Mountain - 603-823-8800

Web Site: www.cannonmt.com

Amenities: Sightseeing, Skiing Hiking, Biking (paved bike path), Canoeing, Paddle Boating, Tram Ride, Ski Museum, Old Man of the Mountain Museum (Bike & boat rentals available).

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South to Lancaster (apx 10 miles) and then through Whitefield to Twin Mountain (another 16 miles).  Continue on Rt. 3 South past Twin Mountain to Rt. 93 South (apx 10 miles) and look for the signs for Cannon Mountain.

Note: Cannon Mountain is a Ski area located at the North end of Franconia Notch State Park.  However it also offers several summer attractions.  You can take a tram ride to the top of Cannon Mountain, and then hike around the summit.  At the base of the mountain are museums, boat rentals or you can rent a bicycle and bike down an 8-mile paved bike path (the ride back up is tough!).  Also you can see Old Man in the Mountain or hike into the Flume Gorge located in the park just South of Cannon Mountain.

 

21.7     Wildcat Mountain - Jackson, NH (apx 45 miles)

A ski area in the winter and a resort destination in the summer offering a number of outdoor activities.

Hours: Operates winter and summer – call ahead.

Location/Phone: Rt. 16 about 21 miles south of Gorham, NH – 603-466-3326 

Web Site: www.skiwildcat.com

Amenities: Sightseeing, Skiing, Hiking, Biking, Wildlife Observing, Fly Fishing, Dining.

Directions: Take Rt. 110 east about 14 miles to Berlin.  You will pass by the Berlin Police Station and go under a small railroad bridge and come to a light.  At that light, take a right, which will bring you to Rt. 16 South.  Follow Rt. 16 South about 6 miles to Gorham, then another 21 miles to Jackson, NH.  Watch for signs to Wildcat on your left.

Note: When returning to Stark, be sure to follow the Rt. 110 signs carefully since it is easy to get lost in the center of Berlin.

 

21.8     Storyland - Glen, NH (apx 48 miles)

A family entertainment center with 16 amusement park rides and 4 live shows all with a children’s storybook theme.

Hours: Operates May thru October – call ahead.

Location/Phone: Rt. 16 about 24 miles south of Gorham, NH - 603-383-4186

Web Site: www.storylandnh.com

Amenities: Sightseeing, antique car ride, teacup ride, raft ride, train ride, boat ride, roller coaster, carousel, theme shows, dining.

Directions: Take Rt. 110 east about 14 miles to Berlin.  You will pass by the Berlin Police Station and go under a small railroad bridge and come to a light.  At that light, take a right, which will bring you to Rt. 16 South.  Follow Rt. 16 South about 6 miles into Gorham and then another 24 miles into Glen, where you will see signs for Storyland just before the junction of Rt. 302 and Rt. 16.

Note: When returning to Stark, be sure to follow the Rt. 110 signs carefully since it is easy to get lost in the center of Berlin.

 

21.9     Heritage Museum - Glen, NH (apx 48 miles)

An interactive museum with twenty-five movie sets that depict life in New Hampshire over the past 300 years.

Hours: Operates May thru October – call ahead.

Location/Phone: Rt. 16 about 24 miles south of Gorham, NH603-383-4186 

Web Site: www.heritagenh.com

Amenities: Elaborate sets depict life in New Hampshire starting in 1634 through the early 1900’s.  The displays incorporate animated and live actors in costume and cover the colonial period, the revolutionary war, the industrial revolution, the civil war and the grand hotel era.  (takes about 2 hours to see).

Directions: Take Rt. 110 east about 14 miles to Berlin.  You will pass by the Berlin Police Station and go under a small railroad bridge and come to a light.  At that light, take a right, which will bring you to Rt. 16 South.  Follow Rt. 16 South about 6 miles into Gorham and then another 24 miles into Glen, where you will see signs for the Heritage Museum.

Note: When returning to Stark, be sure to follow the Rt. 110 signs carefully since it is easy to get lost in the center of Berlin.

 

21.10  Conway Scenic Railway - North Conway, NH (apx 52 miles)

A scenic railway offering sightseeing tours in restored passenger cars.

Hours: Operates April thru October).

Location/Phone: Rt. 16 about 32 miles south of Gorham, NH - 603-356-5251 

Web Site: www.conwayscenic.com

Amenities: Three different scenic tours ranging from 55 minutes to 5 ½ hours.

Directions: Take Rt. 110 east about 14 miles to Berlin.  You will pass by the Berlin Police Station and go under a small railroad bridge and come to a light.  At that light, take a right, which will bring you to Rt. 16 South.  Follow Rt. 16 South about 6 miles into Gorham then another 24 miles into Glen and then another 8 miles to North Conway.  Look for the train station in the center of North Conway.  (Caution: In July and August, North Conway can be very congested during the day).

Note: When returning to Stark, be sure to follow the Rt. 110 signs carefully since it is easy to get lost in the center of Berlin.

 

21.11  Attitash Bear Peak - Bartlett, NH (apx 53 miles)

A ski area in the winter and a resort destination in the summer offering a number of outdoor activities.

Hours: Operates winter and summer – call ahead

Location/Phone: Rt. 302/Rt. 16 about 31 miles south of Gorham, NH – 877-677-7669 

Web Site: www.attitash.com

Amenities: Sightseeing, Skiing, Hiking, Biking, Alpine Slide, Water Slide, Horseback Riding, Mountain Biking, Scenic Chair Lift, Mountain Boarding, Skate Park, Climbing Wall, Trampoline, Driving Range, Dining  (Bike, mountain board and horse rentals available)

Directions: Take Rt. 110 east about 14 miles to Berlin.  You will pass by the Berlin Police Station and go under a small railroad bridge and come to a light.  At that light, take a right, which will bring you to Rt. 16 South.  Follow Rt. 16 South about 6 miles to Gorham, then another 28 miles to Rt. 302 in Glen.  Take a right onto Rt. 302 West and travel 3 miles to the base lodge.

Note: When returning to Stark, be sure to follow the Rt. 110 signs carefully since it is easy to get lost in the center of Berlin.

 

21.12  Whales Tale Water Park - Lincoln, NH (apx 56 miles)

A family oriented water park with wave pool, 6 waterslides, a river ride and a toddlers area. Hours: Operates June thru September – call ahead.

Location/Phone: Rt. 93, about 10 miles south of Franconia Notch - 603-745-8810

Web Site: www.whalestalewaterpark.com

Amenities: Sightseeing, Wave Pool, 6 Waterslides Include A 360’ High Slide, Meandering River Ride, Sand Box, Swings, Volleyball, Tetherball, Horseshoes, Dining.

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South to Lancaster (apx 10 miles) and then through Whitefield to Twin Mountain (another 16 miles).  Continue on Rt. 3 South past Twin Mountain to Rt. 93 South (apx 10 miles).  Take 93 South past Cannon Mountain and Franconia Notch to Exit 33 (apx 12 miles) then take Rt. 1 North (apx 1/2 mile) and look for the Water Park on your left.

 

21.13  Hobo Railroad - Lincoln, NH (apx 56 miles)

A train that runs south about 5 miles to a golf course over several river trestles and back (about an 80 minute ride).  Lunch and drinks can be purchased on the train so this makes a good alternative lunch stop.

Hours:  Operates May thru September – call ahead.

Location/Phone:  Rt. 93 about 10 miles south of Franconia Notch - 603-745-2135 

Web Site: www.hoborr.com

Amenities: Sightseeing, restored train ride, covered bridge viewing, dining.

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South to Lancaster (apx 10 miles) and then through Whitefield to Twin Mountain (another 16 miles).  Continue on Rt. 3 South past Twin Mountain to Rt. 93 South (apx 10 miles).  Take 93 South past Cannon Mountain and Franconia Notch to Exit 32 (apx 13 miles) to Rt. 112 East towards Lincoln.  Look for the Hobo Railroad on your left across from McDonalds.

 

21.14  Clarks Trading Post - Lincoln, NH (apx 57 miles)

A family entertainment center famous for it’s trained bear show.

Hours: Operates June thru September – call ahead.

Location/Phone:  Rt. 93 about 10 miles south of Franconia Notch - 603-745-8913 

Web Site: www.clarkstradingpost.com

Amenities: Sightseeing, steam locomotive ride, covered bridge, trained bear show, circus show, water bumper boats, fun house tour, rustic house tour, several museums.

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South to Lancaster (apx 10 miles) and then through Whitefield to Twin Mountain (another 16 miles).  Continue on Rt. 3 South past Twin Mountain to Rt. 93 South (apx 10 miles).  Take 93 South past Cannon Mountain and Franconia Notch to Exit 33 (apx 12 miles) then take Rt. 1 South (apx 1 mile) to Clarks.


 

21.15 Lost River Gorge - North Woodstock, NH (apx 57 miles)

A narrow steep-walled gorge that has been carved out by a river accessible via a ¾ mile walking path and several bridges.

Hours: Operates May thru October – call ahead.

Location/Phone:  Rt. 93 about 10 miles south of Franconia Notch - 603-745-8720 

Web Site: www.findlostriver.com

Amenities: Sightseeing, waterfalls, caves, catwalks, bridges, gold panning, dining.

Directions: Take Rt. 110 west 8 miles to Rt. 3.  Take Rt. 3 South to Lancaster (apx 10 miles) and then through Whitefield to Twin Mountain (another 16 miles).  Continue on Rt. 3 South past Twin Mountain to Rt. 93 South (apx 10 miles).  Take 93 South past Cannon Mountain and Franconia Notch to Exit 32 (apx 13 miles) to Rt. 112 West towards North Woodstock.  Look for the signs to Lost River Gorge.


22     Map of Parks, Attractions, Restaurants and Stores

 

The map below includes many of the area parks, covered bridges, family attractions, restaurants and stores that we have described in our guide so you can plan your trips more efficiently.